Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

Introducing 'Back From the Brink'

After USMC veteran Bill Kirner's father dies, things go from bad to worse. In this trailer for Back From the Brink, Bill's wife worries about having guns in the house, fearing Bill may take his own life.

Lives Frozen by Conflict

Ukraine's war has displaced more than 1.5 million with over 10,000 civilian casualties. In 2014, when the violence broke out, many young people left, while the elderly stayed behind just barely surviving. 

The Psyche of Syria's War Survivors

This project profiles the courageous journey of Syrian teenage social media icon Muhammad Najem and sheds light on the psychological picture of refugees who live or have family under regime bombings.

Was Your Sister Disturbed?

South Sudan's five-year war has impacted people in ways that have not previously been reported.

Life After Jihad

What happens to the children of suicide bombers and those injured in attacks?

Meet the Journalists: Phil Caller and Tania Rashid

Phil Caller and Tania Rashid discuss their three-part series for PBS NewsHour on the Rohingya refugee crisis—reporting on the mass exodus, rape, child marriage, and human trafficking—and finding a strong will to live and tenacity among the people.

Meet the Journalist: Peter Gwin

How does a country fail? Peter Gwin spent three years traveling to the Central African Republic to look at how a rebellion destroyed the nation and what's happened to its wealth of resources.

Visualizing the Drones Debate

Students examine details from photojournalist Tomas van Houtryve's drone photography project "Blue Sky Days" to analyze the author's purpose for the project and design their own visual arts projects.