Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

Life Without Water

It's critical to agriculture, but those in the West Bank are regularly living without it.

A Tale of Two Cities

A first look at the confounding reality of Jerusalem by Carly Graf, a Northwestern University student fellow, who is reporting on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict through the lens of food.

Lawyers Press Case That 9/11 Confessions Given to F.B.I. Are Tainted

Defense lawyers in the 9/11 case now say that they have growing evidence that the F.B.I. played some role in the interrogations during the years when the suspects were in the secret prisons by feeding questions to the C.I.A., and that the C.I.A. kept a hand in the case after the prisoners were sent to Guantánamo.

The War Widows of Sri Lanka

It has been eight years since the end of Sri Lanka’s armed conflict, and Tamil-speaking war widows in the country's north are still seeking justice for wartime violations.

Scars and Resilience in South Sudan

In South Sudan, the trauma of the war and the use of child soldiers is transmitted from one generation to another. But people are also finding ways to keep hope.

Colombia: After the Peace Deal

After the deal, the hard work: an investigation looking at the successes and failures of Colombia’s peace agreement with the FARC guerrilla group.

The Good Friday Agreement 20 Years On: 'Women's Work'

Twenty years on from the Good Friday Agreement, women are once again holding Northern Irish society together through community and outreach programs, all while continuing to deal with lack of sufficient funding to prevent a backslide into the conflict and sectarianism of The Troubles.

The Ballymurphy Precedent

In The Ballymurphy Precedent, Collum Macrae probes the killings of 10 unarmed Catholics, including a priest and a mother of eight, in the West Belfast housing estate of Ballymurphy in August, 1971.

Meet the Journalists: Phil Caller and Tania Rashid

Phil Caller and Tania Rashid discuss their three-part series for PBS NewsHour on the Rohingya refugee crisis—reporting on the mass exodus, rape, child marriage, and human trafficking—and finding a strong will to live and tenacity among the people.

Meet the Journalist: Peter Gwin

How does a country fail? Peter Gwin spent three years traveling to the Central African Republic to look at how a rebellion destroyed the nation and what's happened to its wealth of resources.

Pulitzer Center Grantees Win 2019 Michael Kelly Award

Pulitzer Center grantees Maggie Michael, Nariman Ayman El-Mofty, and Maad al-Zikry were awarded the 2019 Michael Kelly Award for their Associated Press reporting on the cycles of epidemic, starvation and corruption faced by millions of civilians in Yemen's war.

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