Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

Syria’s Teen Documentarian

Muhammad Najem became a celebrity for his video reports from his war-racked hometown of Eastern Ghouta in Syria. Now displaced to Istanbul, he wants desperately to get back home and continue his work.

Enduring Rifts: Chile 40 Years After the Pinochet Coup

Four decades after the military overthrew Chile’s democratically-elected government, the past remains a vital force in the country. A look at elections, memory and reform in this wounded nation.

Peacekeepers: The Congo Case

UN enforcement of "responsibility to protect" has too often focused more on protecting UN troops than civilian populations. In eastern Congo UN military leaders are talking—and taking—a tougher line.

Facing Fears: Afghanistan on the Brink

What will happen to the progress that’s been made in education and women’s rights in Afghanistan? It’s a legacy NGOs have spent millions building. And many Afghans worry it's what is most at risk.

The Creative Chaos of Libya

Despairing of the ability of their squabbling leaders and militiamen to reestablish the state, Libyans are busy reviving the country on their own.

On Drones, Fences and Future Wars

We think of drones as an exclusively American weapon, but they're not. Look at Israel's violent northern border, where Israel and Hezbollah are already using the flying robots against each other.