Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

An Ugly Peace: What has changed in Iraq

In December 2008 I flew Royal Jordanian from Amman to Iraq's southern city of Basra. Because of the Muslim holiday of Eid, embassies were closed; a contact in the British military promised to obtain visas for me and a colleague upon arrival. The Iraqi customs officials were offended that we did not follow procedure, but a letter from the British commander got us in. It might not have been necessary: when the five Iraqi policemen who examined luggage at the exit saw my colleague's copy of Patrick Cockburn's excellent book on the Shia cleric Muqtada al Sadr, they turned giddy.

Fragile States: Continuing Struggles for Bosnia and Herzegovina

More than a dozen years have passed since Bosnia and Herzegovina's bloody civil war ended. Although the country has repaired physically, its citizens are experiencing political and social challenges. Special correspondent Kira Kay examines political instability in Bosnia 14 years after the end of a brutal civil war that resulted in the deaths of 100,000 people.

Bosnia: Return to Sevarlije

The smells coming from Ramiz Sinanovic's homemade distillery weren't so appetizing, but the promise of the fruit brandy it would eventually yield overrode the immediate discomfort. As Ramiz cranked the handle of the elaborate contraption, the call to Friday midday prayer echoed through the hilltops around us – Ramiz didn't seem to mind that he was making booze at the time of worship. It is his only way of earning money, he explained to me – as a Muslim returning to the Serbian part of Bosnia and Herzegovina, there are not a lot of other economic opportunities around.

Bosnia's Fragile Peace: An Interview with Gordon Milosovic

Recently, Milorad Dodik, the controversial prime minister of the Serb-majority part of Bosnia and Herzegovina, made public comments suggesting that Bosnian Muslims had staged two notorious attacks against them during Bosnia's bloody civil war, presumably to win the support of the international community. The comments created an uproar among many Bosnians and received condemnation from the international community's high representative in the country.

Bosnia's Fragile Peace: An Interview with Gordan Milosovic

Recently, Milorad Dodik, the controversial prime minister of the Serb-majority part of Bosnia and Herzegovina, made public comments suggesting that Bosnian Muslims had staged two notorious attacks against them during Bosnia's bloody civil war, presumably to win the support of the international community. The comments created an uproar among many Bosnians and received condemnation from the international community's high representative in the country.

Nir Rosen on Iraq and Afghanistan

Where and when to watch Foreign Exchange.

With the new administration, the focus of U.S. interests in the Middle East seems to have shifted from Iraq to stabilization of Afghanistan. But periodic suicide bombings in Baghdad and elsewhere remind us that while we may have moved on, the ethnic and religious struggles in Iraq continue. Nir Rosen has recently returned from the region under the auspices of the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. He shares first hand accounts of what he's learned.