Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

Bruce Willis z Banja Luki

Facing the choice of adapting and censoring themselves, or living in fear of a violent attack, only the few reporting for Republika Srpska have continued publishing as independent journalists—and have paid dearly for it.

Afghanistan: WithDraw

What happens when after 13 years a foreign fighting force pulls out of a country and the world turns its attention elsewhere. Life goes on, of course, but what does this look like in Afghanistan?

Central African Republic: Hidden Heart of Africa

The Central African Republic is one of the last truly wild places on earth, a sparsely populated country that until recently remained quietly anonymous. So why did it descend into chaos?

Stories of Hope: Growing Up in Lebanon

Beirut is fissured from political and sectarian strain. Many of the kids living there are on the edges of those cracks. This project tells the stories of those kids as radio and video portraits.

When Militiamen Rule

Less than three years after independence, South Sudan collapsed into civil war. Thousands have died and famine looms on the horizon. Can rebel-leaders-turned-politicians lead the way to peace?

Afghanistan: Packing Up War

How do you turn the lights off on a war? Wars end when troops come home, but what happens to all the stuff?

Love For My Enemy

A multimedia story following survivors and perpetrators of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda as they struggle with their past, meet each other for the first time and dare to ask for forgiveness.

This Week: Friends With Dictators

This week: The U.S.'s troublesome alliances with African dictators, Pulitzer tackles homophobia through NewsArts, and the true meaning of the Iraqi Kurdish referendum.

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