Lesson Plans

Resources for Global News Discussion

Bibi Aisha, 60, has five children and lost her husband during the Taliban regime 19 years ago. She has diabetes and lives with her extended family in Kabul. She used to beg but now depends on her son, who is a laborer. "It is not good to be a widow, it has no benefits, we are on our own," she says. Image by Paula Bronstein. Afghanistan, 2015.

Image by Bruno Federico. Venezuela, 2017.

Image by Bruno Federico. Venezuela, 2017.

Dr. Claudette Crawford-Brown interacts with Shaniqua Long during an art therapy session at Shortwood Practising Infant, Primary and Junior High School in Kingston, Jamaica. Long's mother migrated to the United States. Image by Sabriya Simon. Jamaica.

Dr. Claudette Crawford-Brown interacts with Shaniqua Long during an art therapy session at Shortwood Practising Infant, Primary and Junior High School in Kingston, Jamaica. Long's mother migrated to the United States. Image by Sabriya Simon. Jamaica.

A student holds up seeds to plant in the garden at Leão Machado school in Sao Paulo city. Image by Rhitu Chatterjee. Brazil, 2015.

Workers load finished bricks for transport out of the kiln in Dhading district, Nepal. Despite a national law that bans children under the age of 14 from working, many work alongside their families in the country’s brick making industry. Image by Ann Hermes. Nepal, 2016.

Natural Dyes

Vijayakumar Varathan has been working at Colours of Nature dye house for 15 years. Here he's seen standing in front of indigo t-shirts he helped dye. Image by Esha Chhabra. India, 2016.

Kabwe, Zambia is Africa's most toxic city.

Atop Black Mountain: More than 6 million metric tonnes of lead slag form Black Mountain, a 30-meter pile of toxic lead waste that still contains a sizable quantity of lead, copper, manganese and zinc. Due to a depressed economy and lack of employment among many of Kabwe's residents, scavengers toil daily to mine some of the richer veins of lead slag for resale to reprocessing smelters in Zambia. The work is dangerous and sometimes deadly. 

Taimaa Abazli, 24, holds her new baby Heln in their tent at the Karamalis camp in Thessaloniki. Image by Lynsey Addario for TIME. Greece, 2016.

Taimaa Abazli, 24, holds her new baby Heln in their tent at the Karamalis camp in Thessaloniki. Image by Lynsey Addario for TIME. Greece, 2016.

Fishermen in Kangan, Iran, near the South Pars field. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.

Fishermen in Kangan, Iran, near the South Pars field. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.

Wang Jing Bo has mixed feelings about his job at the Tangshan Guofeng Steel and Iron Factory. The air in Tangshan, his hometown, is among the worst in China, and steel mills like the one he works in are a big part of the problem. They're also a target in the war on pollution leaders declared three years ago. Image by Beth Gardiner. China, 2017.

Wang Jing Bo has mixed feelings about his job at the Tangshan Guofeng Steel and Iron Factory. The air in Tangshan, his hometown, is among the worst in China, and steel mills like the one he works in are a big part of the problem. They're also a target in the war on pollution leaders declared three years ago. Image by Beth Gardiner. China, 2017.

Bibi Kubra tries to comfort her son Mirwais, three, who had just fallen in the mud as a storm hit the Nasaji Bagrami displaced peoples camp. The camp has very basic mud floors that have problems every time it rains. Image by Paula Bronstein. Afghanistan, 2015.

School gardens have become a popular educational tool in Brazil to help students learn to eat healthier. Image by Rhitu Chatterjee. Brazil, 2015.

Men, women and children load and unload finished and unfinished bricks at a kiln in the Dhading district, Nepal. Image by Ann Hermes. Nepal, 2016.

Thaer Sannaa looks on as his wife Suad is wheeled into surgery for an emergency cesarean section and hysterectomy on Sept. 30. Image by Lynsey Addario for TIME. Greece, 2016.

Thaer Sannaa looks on as his wife Suad is wheeled into surgery for an emergency cesarean section and hysterectomy on Sept. 30. Image by Lynsey Addario for TIME. Greece, 2016.

A view of the dried Zayandeh-Rood river from Khaju Bridge, in Isfahan. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.

A view of the dried Zayandeh-Rood river from Khaju Bridge, in Isfahan. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.

Raqia, 26, hides during a sandstorm as she begs on the streets to feed her three children, Ahmad, three; Najila, four; and Jahid, one. Her husband was killed while fighting with the Afghan National Army. She lives in a tent because she can’t afford any rent. Image by Paula Bronstein. Afghanistan, 2015.

Students at the Leão Machado school dig plots before mixing in compost with the soil. Rhitu Chatterjee. Brazil, 2015.

Young men and boys stack bricks inside a kiln in Dharke Bazar in the Dhading district, Nepal. Image by Ann Hermes. Nepal, 2016.

Nour rests with baby Rahaf in their tent on Nov. 7, less than a week after she was born. Image by Lynsey Addario for TIME. Greece, 2016.

Nour rests with baby Rahaf in their tent on Nov. 7, less than a week after she was born. Image by Lynsey Addario for TIME. Greece, 2016.

Women walking across the Zayandeh-Rood river bed, near Joobi Bridge. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.

Women walking across the Zayandeh-Rood river bed, near Joobi Bridge. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.

Mahta, 70, pretends to be handicapped as she begs in downtown Kabul—she feels it’s the only way she can survive as a beggar in a city that has so many. Her husband was killed during the Taliban era, leaving her with four children. She makes eight to ten dollars a day. Image by Paula Bronstein. Afghanistan, 2015.

Sarah Campos (left) and Juliana Santos took the school garden class two years ago. They say the class made them more open to eating vegetables. Image by Rhitu Chatterjee. Brazil, 2015.

Homraj Acharya helps a young girl with a writing lesson at an early childhood education center next to a brick kiln in Dharke Bazar in the Dhading district, Nepal. As the director of Better Brick Nepal, a program aimed at eliminating child labor in brick kilns across the country, Mr. Acharya hopes to provide a better future for the children who call them home. Families are paid per brick, which incentivizes them to recruit their children to make as many as possible. BBN set up the education center last year in Dhading to offer them an alternative. Image by Ann Hermes. Nepal, 2016.

Illham holds her seven week-old baby Faraj in her tent on Nov. 20. Image by Lynsey Addario for TIME. Greece, 2016.

Illham holds her seven week-old baby Faraj in her tent on Nov. 20. Image by Lynsey Addario for TIME. Greece, 2016.

After drought, parts of Gavkhouni Salt Lake become salt extraction sites. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.

After drought, parts of Gavkhouni Salt Lake become salt extraction sites. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.

Sahar, 27, sits with her two handicapped children, Abdul Mosawer (right), four, and Ahmad Modasser, three. Her husband was killed three years ago by a suicide attack in Kabul. She was eight months pregnant at the time, and her son was born two weeks later. She says he is mentally disabled because of the shock he experienced in utero. Her brother-in-law married her out of respect. Image by Paula Bronstein. Afghanistan, 2015.

Dorje Lama loads bricks with Ajmal Hasan, a mule owner, at the Rakta Kali brick kiln in the district of Dhading, Nepal. As many as 60,000 children work in brick kilns across the country. Image by Ann Hermes. Nepal, 2016.

The Khara Desert, near Gavkhouni. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.

The Khara Desert, near Gavkhouni. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.

Gulshan, 29, is pictured with her youngest daughter, Shubillah, four months, and Najiba, five. She has six children and lives in extreme poverty. Her landlord threatened her, saying that if she can’t pay rent, she should hand over her youngest daughter. Gulshan cleans houses to make a few dollars, but it’s not enough to feed her children. Image by Paula Bronstein. Afghanistan, 2015.

Dorje Lama eats lunch outside the hut he once shared with the Hasans and 14 other boys at the Rakta Kali brick kiln. Image by Ann Hermes. Nepal, 2016.

Select a headline below that interests you. Click on the link for the article you selected to see the story as it was published online. As you read, record your responses to the following questions:

  • What details stick with you?
  • What is the main idea of the story? How could you explain it to someone else?
  • How does this story connect to you?

 

1. Confronting the Struggle of Afghanistan's War Widows
December 07, 2015
National Geographic

2. As Venezuela’s Economy Plummets, Mass Exodus Ensues

July 10, 2017

PBS NewsHour

3. Jamaica's 'Barrel Children' Often Come up Empty with a Parent Abroad

December 27, 2017

NBC BLK

4. How Schools in Brazil Are Teaching Kids to Eat Their Vegetables

February 12, 2016

PRI's The World

5. After Nepal’s Earthquake, a Push to Rebuild Without Child Labor

June 08, 2016

Christian Science Monitor, PBS NewsHour

6. India: The Dirty Secret About Your Clothes

December 30, 2016

The Washington Post

7. The Heavy Legacy of Lead in the World's Most Toxic Town—in Pictures

May 29, 2017

The Guardian

8. Children of No Nation 

December 19, 2016

Time

9. A Witness to Iran's Intensifying Struggle with Climate Change 

January 02, 2017

The New Yorker

10. China's Surprising Solutions to Clear Killer Air 

May 05, 2017

National Geographic

11. Exotic Pet Owners of Beijing 

September 23, 2017

The Guardian

12. Haiti: They Call it Canaan

April 3, 2017

Virginia Quarterly Review

13. After Paris, Syrian Refugees Face a Darkening Future by Jeanne Carstensen

November 24, 2015

The Intercept

Educator Notes: 

This resource is a part of the Global News Hunt workshop that Pulitzer Center education staff facilitate in-person and over Skype. Prior to selecting one of the resources within this lesson, students practice looking closely at images to make predictions about the story the image is intending to communicate. They work with the following prompts:

  • 3 Observations (Note details in the image)
  • 2 Questions (What more do you want to know about what you see in the image?)
  • 1 Prediction  (What story do you think the image is hoping to communicate?)

Students then practice comparing their predictions to the actual article. In the end, they brainstorm connections between the story and their own lives. They consider the following:

* Why does this story matter to me and my community?

If you are interested in connecting the Global News Hunt workshop with your students, contact Pulitzer Center's education staff by emailing fmostoufi@pulitzercenter.org.

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