Lesson Plans

Presentation for World Affairs Council

Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

UPOEG community leader and political activist Miguel Angel Jiménez Blanco spoke to voters’ in small towns – San Marcos, Límon, Ayutla, Tecoanapa – in order to collect testimonies of alleged vote-buying and coercion in San Marcos, Guerrero in June 2015.

Mexican army troops line up on a highway leading to Oaxaca City on the day of the country’s midterm elections, in response to threats by a radical teacher’s union to disrupt elections. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

A polling place is set up under an awning on a muddy dirty road in Oaxaca City on the day of the country’s midterm elections, after a radical teacher’s union refused to allow polling places to be set up in schools. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

A polling official marks a voter’s thumb with indelible ink after he casts his ballot in the midterm elections. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

Two female voters in Oaxaca City wait to cast their ballots in the midterm elections. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

A polling place prepares for voters in the midterm elections in Oaxaca City after a radical teacher’s union refused to allow polling places to be set up in schools. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

Sebastian Barragán Hidalgo of MéxicoLeaks demonstrates the encrypted USB technology. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

Encrypted USB technology makes it possible for citizens to submit information anonymously to a website. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

Stolen ballot boxes and ballots burned by radical teachers and their supporters in Oaxaca City’s main plaza on the day of the country’s midterm elections. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

Radical teachers and their supporters burn stolen ballot boxes and ballots in Oaxaca City’s main plaza. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

Miguel Angel Jiménez Blanco, coordinator and organizer for Unión de Pueblos y Organizaciones del Estado de Guerrero (UPOEG), uses his cellphone to record a voter’s testimony of alleged vote-buying and coercion in San Marcos, Guerrero, on June 13, 2015. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

Students in Guadalajara participate in a week-long event called CampusParty aimed at improving technology expertise. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

Women technologists and digital media experts take part in CampusNight held in Mexico City, an event aimed at improving their technology skills. Image by Kara Andrade. Mexico, 2015.

Pre-workshop Check In:

Number your post it from 1 to 5. Write your responses to the following questions: 

1) Have you had a journalist in your classroom before? (yes/no)   2) On a scale of 1 to 4, how often do you discuss global issues in your class? (1- not at all, 4-very often)   3) On a scale of 1 to 4, how often do you use reporting in your class? (1- not at all, 4-very often)
  4) What are barriers that make it hard to use global issues in your classroom?
  5) What are you hoping to get out of this session?   Warm up:

1) Turn and talk: What global issues do you hope to explore with your students this year?

 

Introducing the Pulitzer Center: Our Mission and What We Do

1) http://pulitzercenter.org/about-us

2) http://pulitzercenter.org/gateways

3) http://pulitzercenter.org/education

Our goals for today:

 

Teachers will...

1) Learn about the Pulitzer Center and its education resources
2) Meet with a professional journalist and engage in her reporting through discussion and a Q&A
3) Reflect on how they can globalize their own curriculums using Pulitzer Center resources
4) Explore the Lesson Builder and start a lesson plan that uses Pulitzer Center journalism

  Introducing Kara Andrade and her project "Mexico: Technology, Civic Participation and Accountability"

1) Engaging with the themes

- http://pulitzercenter.org/builder/lesson/18968

2) Skype with Kara

- What did you report?

- How did you report it?

 

Introducing Pulitzer Center education programs:

1) Programming

2) Questions
 

Steps for Exploring the Lesson Builder:
 

1) Go to www.pulitzercenter.org/builder

2) Create an account

3) Browse a model lesson and select one to adapt by clicking "Use this lesson" and then "modify this lesson"

4) Create your own short lesson plan idea by doing the following:

  • Click "Create Lesson"
  • Create a working title for your lesson
  • Search for Resources
  • Write in student instructions
     
Closing

On a separate sheet of paper, write your responses to the following questions:

1) On a scale of 1 to 4, how easy was it to use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder? (1-very difficult to 4-very easy)

2) What elements of the Lesson Builder did you find the most useful?

3) What was challenging/frustrating about using the Lesson Builder?

4) On a scale of 1 to 4, how likely are you to use the Lesson Builder to write lessons and units for your classes next year (1-not likely to 4-very likely)

5) On a scale of 1 to 4, how likely are you to use the Lesson Builder to look for completed lesson plans that you can use or adapt? (0-not likely to 4-very likely)

6) What did you enjoy and learn from today's workshop?

7) What would you change about today's workshop?

 

fmostoufi@pulitzercenter.org
202.734.3769

Please stay in touch! 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Builder Survey