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Keeping Refugees in Africa

Since last summer, the flow of refugees from Libya to Europe has shrunk considerably. The EU attributes this to its own successful policy, but reality is a lot more depressing.

The Drug Decimating Russia’s Women

Designer drugs called ‘bath salts’ in the U.S. are dangerous to Americans, but addiction is epidemic among Russians, especially women. Many shoot up, and many contract HIV/AIDS.

Finding Therapy in Jordan

With only 60 to 100 psychiatrists in Jordan, there's little help for Syrian refugees. Local organizations and refugees are leading the work to ensure that refugees get the therapy that they need.

Finding Border Landowners Was Harder Than Expected

Starting with hundreds of cases, we reached out to dozens of property owners who lost land for the border fence. Some had died, some deflected questions to lawyers, and many just didn’t want to talk to us.

Sean Gallagher's "China's Growing Sands" featured on NYT Photography Blog

Sean Gallagher tasted sand as he focused his camera lens on a masked man who had emerged suddenly from the bright orange cloud that enveloped both of them. Unable to see more than a few yards in front of himself, Mr. Gallagher pressed the shutter and the man disappeared into the sandstorm, as if he had been an apparition.

Climate Change in Bangladesh: Rising sea levels threaten low-lying lands

A key feature of the Pulitzer Center's upcoming web portal on climate change is Daniel Grossman's reporting from Bangladesh on how rising sea levels threaten this South Asian country.

Yesterday Grossman had a piece run on PRI's The World, looking at the ways in which Bangladesh is experimenting with protecting itself. Among the experiments -- using floods to prevent floods.

See the piece as it ran at www.theworld.org

Meredith May Receives Excellence in Journalism Award

Pulitzer Center grantee Meredith May receives an award from the Society of Professional Journalists for her work on the project "Olga's Girls," which tells the story of indentured servants in Nepal.

"China's Growing Sands" Featured on duckrabbit's Blog

Sean Gallagher won Magnum photographer David Alan Harvey's first Emerging Photographer Fund in 2008, and used the prize to travel to China to photograph the devastating effects of desertification on the most populous country on earth. Since then he has also received grant money to continue his work from the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting. Recently, he even managed to slip into North Korea, disguised as a tourist.

I've been following Sean's progress through his many blogs – his own, one on Resolve and one for the Pulitzer Centre.

People Around the World Share Their Water Stories

Nine-year-old Ely Kleinsmith knows that water and sanitation are issues that affect us all -- and that it's up to each of us to insure that everyone in the world has access to these resources that too many of us take for granted. What Ely has done, in his hometown of Solon, Iowa, is to found a Water Club aimed at raising awareness, and attract funding, for water-related programs in Haiti.

Nepalese Slavery Lesson Hits Home

A story from the St. Louis-Post Dispatch covered a classroom visit by Meredith May, in which she told high school students about the Pulitzer Center-sponsored reporting project "Olga's Girls."

Loretta Tofani interviews with the Washington Observer

Editor in Chief Lily Chen interviews Pulitzer Center grant-recipient Loretta Tofani about her "American Imports, Chinese Deaths" series. January 9, 2008, the Washington Observer (Mandarin Chinese), a World Security Institute publication. Lily interviews Loretta Tofani, an American journalist, about her call for people's attention to Chinese workers' benefits and rights.

Note: This article is in Mandarin Chinese.