Media

Article

His Sister Missing, a Man Waits in Anguish

Zulma Corhuari, 16, stepped out for a moment to get an aspirin for her headache. Her family never saw her again. Her brother Victor is desperate and suspects the worst. "There's no justice," he said.

Deadly Habits Passed Along to Children

In Bolivia, entire families are surrendering to cheap drugs—lethal and mind-altering concoctions of glue, gasoline, and paint thinner. The problem is growing and there's no solution in sight.

Saving Souls and Resisting Temptation

Ivan Ramirez runs an orphanage near Cochabamba. He started with one child—"a delinquent in miniature," Ramirez called him. More children arrived and the orphanage grew. "It was God's plan," he said.

Memory Keepers

After historic protests in 2016, has the reality of women's rights in Poland improved?

Lines and Lineage

2017 CatchLight Fellow Tomas van Houtryve explores the history of the U.S.-Mexico border through period-accurate photography in this photo essay for Harper's.

Kingdom of Women

In southwestern China, the Mosuo uphold one of the world’s last matrilineal societies. As tourists flock to the region, bringing money and clashing values, can female-first traditions endure?

Water and Peace: Security's Undercurrent

Specialists from across sectors gathered at the National Geographic Society on World Water Day, Monday, March 22, to share information on an issue seemingly so simple we often take it for granted.

But you don't have to be an expert to know about water.

Just ask the man who sold me my coffee today. "Well, that's obvious," he said of the event, "it doesn't matter what else people have; without water, they're going to go after each other to get it."

Letter from India: A Refinery or a Village's Existence

Inside the shade of a tribal hut in rural India, I am listening to Devudama tell her story in Telugu. Our translator sits between us with the neighbor's baby on her lap while the neighbor chats with a friend. The baby is busily gumming our translator's arm. Two dogs sleep in the sun, and children's clothing is drying on the slanted, low-hanging roof of the opposite hut.

Government Funding for the Press (with Poll)

This morning, David Westphal and Geoffrey Cowan gave a press briefing at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., to discuss their report "Public Policy and Funding the News." Westphal is executive in residence at the USC Annenberg School for Journalism and former Washington editor for McClatchy. Cowan is dean emeritus at Annenberg.

Sean Gallagher's "China's Growing Sands" featured on NYT Photography Blog

Sean Gallagher tasted sand as he focused his camera lens on a masked man who had emerged suddenly from the bright orange cloud that enveloped both of them. Unable to see more than a few yards in front of himself, Mr. Gallagher pressed the shutter and the man disappeared into the sandstorm, as if he had been an apparition.

Climate Change in Bangladesh: Rising sea levels threaten low-lying lands

A key feature of the Pulitzer Center's upcoming web portal on climate change is Daniel Grossman's reporting from Bangladesh on how rising sea levels threaten this South Asian country.

Yesterday Grossman had a piece run on PRI's The World, looking at the ways in which Bangladesh is experimenting with protecting itself. Among the experiments -- using floods to prevent floods.

See the piece as it ran at www.theworld.org

Meredith May Receives Excellence in Journalism Award

Pulitzer Center grantee Meredith May receives an award from the Society of Professional Journalists for her work on the project "Olga's Girls," which tells the story of indentured servants in Nepal.