Issue

Women, Children, Crisis

In crisis areas, it is often women and children who suffer most. Countries with underdeveloped economies and countries at war face countless difficulties, but stories of the particular misery faced by women and children are often overlooked—resulting in far-reaching human, social and economic consequences.

Women, Children, Crisis pulls from a number of reporting projects around the globe that illuminate the adversity and outright crimes endured by women and children, as well as creative responses to these challenges.

Women, Children, Crisis

May 15, 2018

We Became Fragments

Lacy Jane Roberts, Luisa Conlon, Hanna Miller

After losing his mother and four siblings in a bombing that left him injured, Syrian teenager Ibraheem Sarhan and his father make a new life for themselves in Winnipeg, Canada.

April 06, 2018

Native American Youth: Health and Sports

Viridiana Vidales Coyt

Native youth are nine times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than their non-Hispanic white peers, according to an NIH study . Community organizations in New Mexico would like to change that.

January 16, 2018

The Center Cannot Hold

Jack Losh

Five years since war erupted, life in the Central African Republic is again spiralling out of control, with families caught in a deepening humanitarian crisis. How do you survive when your country is collapsing?

A Teenager Starting Over in Canada

Samantha Power met Ibraheem Sarhan in 2014 after his home in Syria was bombed. Here, having watched this Op-Doc film, she reflects on his progress.

Kids of Kakuma

TIME for Kids travels to Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya to learn what life is like for children who live and go to school there.

Meet the Journalist: Melissa Noel

As they immigrate for a chance to provide for their famlies, parents are leaving their children behind in Jamaica—possibly creating a mental health problem among Jamaican youth.

Creating Everyday Coolidge

Inspired by a Pulitzer Center workshop introducing Everyday Africa, a DC teacher and her students created "Everyday Coolidge" to combat stereotypes and share everyday life at Coolidge High School.