Issue

Women, Children, Crisis

In crisis areas, it is often women and children who suffer most. Countries with underdeveloped economies and countries at war face countless difficulties, but stories of the particular misery faced by women and children are often overlooked—resulting in far-reaching human, social and economic consequences.

Women, Children, Crisis pulls from a number of reporting projects around the globe that illuminate the adversity and outright crimes endured by women and children, as well as creative responses to these challenges.

Women, Children, Crisis

Canada's Missing and Murdered Women

Over the past three decades, thousands of Canadian Aboriginal women have been murdered or gone missing. The government has begun investigating why indigenous women are so vulnerable to violence.

South Sudan in Crisis

South Sudan is the world’s newest nation but ethnic violence, economic collapse and famine are spiralling. Millions of lives, and the future of the country, are at stake.

A Postcard Home

"A Postcard Home" is a collaborative series exploring a remarkable chapter in human migration through the viewpoint of a child.

We Have No Choice

Most African migrants heading to Europe unwittingly follow the ancient caravan routes of the trans-Saharan slave trade. Along the way, many are trafficked, sold, and brutally exploited.

Ecuador: Health Consequences of Ceramic Glazing

An Andean village has battled severe lead toxicity from ceramics production, and now residents face the challenges of alternative glazing compounds or abandoning their cottage industry altogether.

Ending Female Genital Mutilation in Ethiopia

Female genital mutilation affects 200 million girls and women worldwide. But in Ethiopia, Bogaletch Gebre's nonprofit has reduced FGM in one region from 97 percent to 3 percent by working within communities.

The Survivors of the Rohingya Genocide

An investigation into Myanmar's state-orchestrated murder of thousands of Rohingya Muslims — and the second tragedy unfolding in the refugee camps

A Retreat From Massacre

The T'boli-Dulangan Manobo, an indigenous group in the Philippines, lived peacefully in the village of Sitio Datalbonglangon—until the country's armed forces showed up.

Privatizing Education in Africa

This week: for-profit schools in the most impoverished places; identifying bodies from the U.S.-Mexico border; and age-based asylum in Sweden.

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