Issue

Women, Children, Crisis

In crisis areas, it is often women and children who suffer most. Countries with underdeveloped economies and countries at war face countless difficulties, but stories of the particular misery faced by women and children are often overlooked—resulting in far-reaching human, social and economic consequences.

Women, Children, Crisis pulls from a number of reporting projects around the globe that illuminate the adversity and outright crimes endured by women and children, as well as creative responses to these challenges.

Women, Children, Crisis

The Privatization of Education in Africa

The fastest growing chain of schools in the world is a highly controversial for-profit company backed by Silicon Valley investors which promises to educate the poorest of the poor.

Bringing Hope to Women with Cancer in Haiti

Cancer is a terrifying word to anyone, but for women living in developing countries, it can be truly devastating. In Haiti, women must overcome immense challenges to seek diagnosis and care.

A Woman's Crime and Punishment

When unmarried sex is outlawed, pregnancy out of wedlock is proof of a crime. Women are jailed—along with their babies.

Venezuela: A Ticking Time-bomb

As Venezuela’s social and economic crisis deepens, thousands of citizens are taking to the streets. Meanwhile, a quieter humanitarian one is unfolding as hunger and malnutrition spread.

Canada's Missing and Murdered Women

Over the past three decades, thousands of Canadian Aboriginal women have been murdered or gone missing. The government has begun investigating why indigenous women are so vulnerable to violence.

South Sudan in Crisis

South Sudan is the world’s newest nation but ethnic violence, economic collapse and famine are spiralling. Millions of lives, and the future of the country, are at stake.

The Survivors of the Rohingya Genocide

An investigation into Myanmar's state-orchestrated murder of thousands of Rohingya Muslims — and the second tragedy unfolding in the refugee camps

A Retreat From Massacre

The T'boli-Dulangan Manobo, an indigenous group in the Philippines, lived peacefully in the village of Sitio Datalbonglangon—until the country's armed forces showed up.

Meet the Journalist: Alice Su

Why do young people from Jordan and Tunisia decide to join militant groups in Syria? Are they driven by ideological, economic, or other factors? How are governments trying to stop them?

Meet the Journalist: Mathilde Dratwa

Mathilde Dratwa discusses what attracted her to Rhitu Chatterjee’s reporting on India’s school lunch program and describes the challenges of honoring nuanced reporting in short animations.

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