Issue

Women, Children, Crisis

In crisis areas, it is often women and children who suffer most. Countries with underdeveloped economies and countries at war face countless difficulties, but stories of the particular misery faced by women and children are often overlooked—resulting in far-reaching human, social and economic consequences.

Women, Children, Crisis pulls from a number of reporting projects around the globe that illuminate the adversity and outright crimes endured by women and children, as well as creative responses to these challenges.

Women, Children, Crisis

November 01, 2017

Down from the Mountains

Max Duncan

Three children in a remote corner of China are among millions getting by while their parents work far away in wealthier cities.

September 25, 2017

Iceland: Ethical Challenges of Genetic Testing

Anna Marsibil Clausen

Genetic scientists in Iceland want to warn 2,400 people who are more likely than others to develop breast cancer, but they can't. The individuals have the right not to know.

September 04, 2017

Russia: Women Hit Hard by HIV/AIDS

Anna Nemtsova, Sophia Jones

The HIV/AIDS epidemic is at a tipping point in Russia, where an estimated 1-1.5 million people are HIV positive and the Kremlin has long rejected international assistance. Women are being left behind.

August 23, 2017

The Cookstove Conundrum

Michelle Nijhuis, Lynn Johnson

Nearly half the people on earth use open fires to cook their food and heat their homes, and the price they pay is steep. But changing the world's kitchens is surprisingly complicated.

Meet the Journalist: Tracey Eaton

Tracey Eaton discusses his project, "Cuban Youth: A New Dawn?" Eaton, the former Havana bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News, interviewed 20-somethings about their hopes and dreams for the future.

This Week: Pakistan and India are Becoming Nuclear Rivals

This week: Why Pakistan and India are equipping their submarines with nuclear-tipped missiles, what life is like for ethnic minority Vietnamese living in Cambodia, and how armed groups have filled a power vacuum in the Central African Republic.