Issue

Women, Children, Crisis

In crisis areas, it is often women and children who suffer most. Countries with underdeveloped economies and countries at war face countless difficulties, but stories of the particular misery faced by women and children are often overlooked—resulting in far-reaching human, social and economic consequences.

Women, Children, Crisis pulls from a number of reporting projects around the globe that illuminate the adversity and outright crimes endured by women and children, as well as creative responses to these challenges.

Women, Children, Crisis

The Child Witches of Nollywood

This innovative project utilizes illustration, photography, and video to investigate what role the Nigerian movie industry has played in the increase of witchcraft accusations against children.

The Center Cannot Hold

Five years since war erupted, life in the Central African Republic is again spiralling out of control, with families caught in a deepening humanitarian crisis. How do you survive when your country is collapsing?

Bolivian Youth: In Harm's Way

Bolivia can be a rough place for children, especially the most vulnerable. Bolivian President Evo Morales takes pride in protecting youth, but critics question whether he has done enough.

The Biggest Mass Grave in Mexico

A group of mothers with missing children just unearthed the biggest narco mass gravesite in Mexican history. This project documents their struggle to discover what happened their kids.

Child Soldiers of South Sudan

In South Sudan there are still 19,000 children in armed forces, with boys trained to fight and girls taken as "wives."

Meet the Journalist: Peg Tyre

"Bridge International Academies" is a for-profit company that seeks to educate some of the world’s poorest children. Its Silicon Valley investors call it “revolutionary.” Others are skeptical.

Meet the Journalist: Emily Gogolak

Emily Gogolak, from the field in Tegucigalpa, discusses her reporting on violence against women in Honduras and the deportations of mothers and children from immigration detention centers in Texas.

Creating Everyday Coolidge

Inspired by a Pulitzer Center workshop introducing Everyday Africa, a DC teacher and her students created "Everyday Coolidge" to combat stereotypes and share everyday life at Coolidge High School.

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