Issue

Women, Children, Crisis

In crisis areas, it is often women and children who suffer most. Countries with underdeveloped economies and countries at war face countless difficulties, but stories of the particular misery faced by women and children are often overlooked—resulting in far-reaching human, social and economic consequences.

Women, Children, Crisis pulls from a number of reporting projects around the globe that illuminate the adversity and outright crimes endured by women and children, as well as creative responses to these challenges.

Women, Children, Crisis

March 23, 2010

The Struggle for Health in Chiapas

Samuel Loewenberg

An infant born in the state of Chiapas as three times as likely to die as the rate for Mexico as a whole. The maternal mortality rate in neighboring Oaxaca is twice the national average. This project explains why, and what is being done in response.

September 29, 2009

Mothers of Ethiopia

Hanna Ingber

In the U.S., a woman has a 1 in 4,800 chance of dying from complications due to pregnancy or childbirth in her lifetime. In Ethiopia, a woman has a 1 in 27 chance of dying. Hanna shares her experiences and observations in a five-part series on Mothers Of Ethiopia.

June 16, 2009

Guinea-Bissau: Dying for Treatment

Marco Vernaschi

Sub-Saharan Africa, the poorest region on Earth, is a place where more than 600,000 women die in pregnancy or childbirth every year due to lack of proper care and only 30 percent of the population has access to health care at all. The situation in Guinea-Bissau is among the...

May 04, 2009

Run or Hide? Seeking Refuge in Tanzania

Mary Wiltenburg

When Bill Clinton Hadam's refugee family was approved for resettlement in the U.S., the boy's parents faced a "Sophie's Choice" dilemma: him or his sister. After escaping slaughter in Congo and Rwanda, the family waited in a Tanzanian camp for nearly a decade. Rape was common there, and Bill's...

March 01, 2009

The Roots of Ethnic Conflict in Eastern DRC

Michael Kavanagh

The 2006 election in the Democratic Republic of Congo was supposed to usher in a new period of peace and stability for the beleaguered, exhausted Congolese people. Instead, it made one of the country's most intractable problems worse. After the election, the small but powerful Tutsi community in Eastern...

February 25, 2009

Ghana’s Kayayo: Reaching for a Better Life

Peter DiCampo

Every year, thousands of women and young girls migrate from Ghana’s poorer, Muslim north to the major cities of the Christian south. Known as Kayayo, they travel to work as porters in city markets, and spend their days carrying heavy loads for meager wages. Due to a shortage of employment opportunities and money for housing, many end up sleeping on the streets or being coerced into sexual servitude in exchange for shelter.

Field Notes Podcast: Featuring Our Student Fellows

Our student fellows and professional journalists reflect on the importance of being flexible, remaining open to where stories lead, and listening to the people whose stories we tell.