Issue

Women, Children, Crisis

In crisis areas, it is often women and children who suffer most. Countries with underdeveloped economies and countries at war face countless difficulties, but stories of the particular misery faced by women and children are often overlooked—resulting in far-reaching human, social and economic consequences.

Women, Children, Crisis pulls from a number of reporting projects around the globe that illuminate the adversity and outright crimes endured by women and children, as well as creative responses to these challenges.

Women, Children, Crisis

March 03, 2015

Myanmar: When Child Soldiers Retire

Spike Johnson

In Myanmar the use of child soldiers remains commonplace but under increasing international pressure small numbers of them are being released from service, returning to parents who thought them dead.

January 04, 2015

Teenage Pregnancy in the Dominican Republic

Jennifer Gonzalez, Luke Nozicka

As teen pregnancy rates are slowly decreasing in the United States, rates in the Dominican Republic are double the world average, with 1 of 10 teen girls becoming pregnant in 2013.

December 29, 2014

China: Students With Disabilities

Jessie Li

China has committed to nine years of education for all children, but students with physical disabilities often confront discrimination. How do these students access education?

September 25, 2014

Saving Kenya’s Mothers

Paul Nevin, Adiba Khan

Kenya continues to lose 7,000 mothers to preventable deaths each year. If the solutions are known, why has there been so little progress in saving their lives?

September 02, 2014

Cervical Cancer in Uganda

Sascha Garrey

In the U.S., the HPV vaccine and regular pap smears have almost stopped the pervasiveness of cervical cancer in its tracks. In Uganda, however, cervical cancer is the most fatal cancer for women.

This Week: A Trafficked Girl

This week: the incredible migrant trail of one woman, Bangladesh's toxic leather tanneries, and the Maldives losing battle agains climate change and losing democracy.