November 20, 2014 / Instagram
Peter Gwin
Notes from the field by National Geographic editor and Pulitzer Center grantee Peter Gwin, reporting from Central African Republic earlier this year.
November 17, 2014 / Untold Stories
Robert Eric Shoemaker
Paolo the economist sweats, oils his palms, tars his print-press at high noon. He worries with his bone-knife— Who will buy? Who’ll buy?
November 14, 2014 /
Lauren Shepherd, Jon Sawyer
Hear from journalists, academic experts on religion's unlikely role in meeting environmental challenges in China.
June 2, 2014
Alissa Quart, Alice Proujansky
Writer Alissa Quart and photographer Alice Proujansky discuss their project about a nanny's reunification with her son after a decade of separation for economic reasons.
June 2, 2014 / Al Jazeera
Jens Erik Gould, David Rochkind
Why doesn't tuberculosis attract as much attention—or get as much funding—as HIV or malaria?
June 2, 2014
Jenna Krajeski
Between anti-government protests and investigations into high-level corruption, it has been a tumultuous year in Turkey.
May 28, 2014 / World Press Photo Academy
Sean Gallagher
The World Press Photo Academy interviews Sean Gallagher about his recent work on pollution issues in India and his approach to photojournalism and video storytelling.
May 15, 2014 / MediaStorm
Shiho Fukada
Shiho Fukada's portrait series, Japan's Disposable Workers, is now available as a three-part documentary.
May 15, 2014 / GlobalPost
Allyn Gaestel, Allison Shelley
In Nigeria, birth control is stigmatized, misunderstood, and inaccessible—especially for youth. Abortion is legal only when the life of a mother is endangered. But at least 760,000 occur every year.
May 8, 2014 / Untold Stories
Sean Gallagher
Sean Gallagher's short film "The Toxic Price of Leather" tells of communities in India that have been harmed by pollution from leather tannery industry.
May 7, 2014 / GlobalPost
Shiho Fukada
More and more young Japanese women aspire to work as hostesses in bars. Experts say this popularity reflects a lack of professional opportunities for Japanese women.
May 1, 2014 / The Seattle Times
Craig Welch, Steve Ringman
Scientists have documented that souring seas caused by CO2 emissions are dissolving pteropods, a key marine food source. The research raises questions about what other sea life might be affected.
April 30, 2014 / NBC News
Jonathan Vigliotti
Climate change is causing a small hunting village in Greenland to come face to face with an unlikely predator: polar bears.

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