October 10, 2012 /
Paul Salopek
Journalist Paul Salopek is preparing to leave on a journey that will take seven years and span 39 countries—and he is doing it all on foot.
People lighting candles in Nepal one year after earthquake
April 25, 2016 / PBS NewsHour
Fred de Sam Lazaro, Richard Coolidge
Scenes from Nepal's destruction captured in 360°.
April 25, 2016 / PBS NewsHour
Fred de Sam Lazaro, Richard Coolidge
Has corruption stalled Nepal’s earthquake recovery?
April 11, 2016
Rob Tinworth
Our grantee makes a video explaining how he does his work.
April 10, 2016 / PBS NewsHour
Nick Schifrin, Zach Fannin
Nick Schifrin and Zach Fannin interview young Kenyans who have joined Al Shabaab, the Somalia-based terror group.
April 9, 2016 / PBS NewsHour
Nick Schifrin, Zach Fannin
Nick Schifrin and Zach Fannin report on east Africa's deadliest terror group, Al Shabaab.
April 8, 2016 / PBS NewsHour
Carrie Ching
How a Panamanian law firm helps the rich hide their wealth.
April 8, 2016 / National Geographic
Juan Herrero, Tik Root
Serge Rwigamba is the head guide at the Kigali Genocide Memorial in Rwanda, a role he finds therapeutic. Like any job though, it comes with its quirks, characters, and challenges.
April 7, 2016
David Rochkind
Grantee David Rochkind explains the role of photographs in adding a human element to science stories.
April 7, 2016
Amy Maxmen
Grantee Amy Maxmen discusses the similarities and differences between science and journalism.
April 5, 2016
Jon Cohen
With Pulitzer Center support, Jon Cohen is coordinating a package of video, print, and online stories on ending AIDS for Science, PBS NewsHour, BuzzFeed, and UCTV.
April 3, 2016 / Retro Report
Kit R. Roane
Carl Sagan was among a group of Cold War scientists who once feared that a nuclear war could plunge the world into a deadly ice age. Three decades later, does this theory still resonate?
April 3, 2016 / International Consortium of Investigative Journalists
Carrie Ching
Behind the email chains, invoices and documents that make up the Panama Papers are often unseen victims of wrongdoing enabled by the shadowy offshore industry.

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