Tags

Youth

There are now more people under the age of 25 in the world than ever before, presenting both opportunities for social progress and considerable challenges. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Youth” feature reporting on young people, the issues they face and the potential for change they represent. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on youth.

 

How Food Became a Weapon of War in Yemen

A proxy war in Yemen between Iran-backed Houthi rebels and a Saudi Arabia-led coalition has led to starvation; relief supplies have been blocked to the poorest country in the region.

Scarred By War, Yemen’s Children Carry Burdens Beyond Their Years

In Yemen, some of the most vulnerable victims are the 2 million children on the brink of starvation, or those who lost limbs during the fighting. In Aden, many children have been fit with prosthetic limbs, but with rudimentary materials and old technology, they are sometimes barely functional.

A Teenager Starting Over in Canada

Samantha Power met Ibraheem Sarhan in 2014 after his home in Syria was bombed. Here, having watched this Op-Doc film, she reflects on his progress.

May 15, 2018

We Became Fragments

Lacy Jane Roberts, Luisa Conlon, Hanna Miller

After losing his mother and four siblings in a bombing that left him injured, Syrian teenager Ibraheem Sarhan and his father make a new life for themselves in Winnipeg, Canada.

May 01, 2018

Run, Hide, Fight

Spike Johnson

Active shooter response trainers offer new methods of defense to emergency services, schools, and workplaces, as mass murder rates rise in the U.S.

April 06, 2018

Native American Youth: Health and Sports

Viridiana Vidales Coyt

Native youth are nine times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than their non-Hispanic white peers, according to an NIH study . Community organizations in New Mexico would like to change that.

January 16, 2018

The Center Cannot Hold

Jack Losh

Five years since war erupted, life in the Central African Republic is again spiralling out of control, with families caught in a deepening humanitarian crisis. How do you survive when your country is collapsing?

January 12, 2018

Bolivian Youth: In Harm's Way

Tracey Eaton

Bolivia can be a rough place for children, especially the most vulnerable. Bolivian President Evo Morales takes pride in protecting youth, but critics question whether he has done enough.

January 09, 2018

The Biggest Mass Grave in Mexico

Jesse Alejandro Cottrell

A group of mothers with missing children just unearthed the biggest narco mass gravesite in Mexican history. This project documents their struggle to discover what happened their kids.

December 20, 2017

Trauma Among Syrian Refugees

Sawsan Morrar

While Syrians find refuge and aid in Jordan, little has been done to address the mental trauma they have faced—until now.

October 06, 2017

Catholic Sex Abuse on Guam

Anita Hofschneider, Cory Lum

Guam is reeling from nearly 100 lawsuits alleging sexual abuse by various Catholic priests, including the archbishop. Why has it taken so long for these accusations to surface?

Meet the Journalist: Melissa Noel

As they immigrate for a chance to provide for their famlies, parents are leaving their children behind in Jamaica—possibly creating a mental health problem among Jamaican youth.

Meet the Journalist: Alice Su

Journalist Alice Su speaks about her 2017 project on religion among resettled refugees in Germany, a country that has accepted more asylum seekers than any other European country.

Meet the Journalist: James Whitlow Delano

Post-NAFTA Mexico was flooded with cheap sugary, fatty junk food from the U.S.–triggering a dual crisis: obesity and malnutrition. As NAFTA renegotiations progress, will these crises come up at all?

Meet the Journalist: Peg Tyre

"Bridge International Academies" is a for-profit company that seeks to educate some of the world’s poorest children. Its Silicon Valley investors call it “revolutionary.” Others are skeptical.

Meet the Journalist: Sarah A. Topol

What happens to children in Nigeria who were abducted by Boko Haram? Sarah Topol discusses the lives of those who have not escaped and are still controlled by the militant Islamist group.

This Week: Cracking the Indian Patriarchy

A poor school for girls in rural India reshapes the role of women, how Iraq's legal institutions are struggling to give closure to victims, and HIV's hold on Nigeria, Russia, and Florida.

Beyond War Conference Highlights

Journalists and youth activists took center stage at the Beyond War Conference, sharing their vision for what it means to maintain journalistic integrity in times of peacebuilding and conflict. 

This Week: Jailing the Mentally Ill

This Week: What happens when people with mental illness go to jail, the Pulitzer Center enters its second year as a media partner for the Catchlight Fellowship, and students are invited to submit poetry about peace and conflict.

This Week: Witch Hunts Today

This week: Indian women fight back against witch hunts, Bolivia's child labor laws struggle to combat abuse, and the lives of Filipino women whose government killed their loved ones for drug use.

10 Lesson Plans to Celebrate Earth Day

In celebration of Earth Day, we've compiled our top ten lesson plans that feature reporting on how communities around the world are responding to diverse environmental issues.

Visualizing Gun Violence

Students will analyze how selection and order of information are used to tell stories of gun violence. They will curate photo essays and produce policy recommendations to reduce local violence.

Exploring Other Countries

In this lesson, students use the Pulitzer Center website to research a specific country before giving an oral presentation. 

Interview Skills for English Language Learners

This lesson helps students decode and connect with images from a reporting project about migration. The students then interview each other, and go on to interview community members about immigration.