April 3, 2014 /
Kwame Dawes, Andre Lambertson
Jamaica is proud of its religious tradition, but how has the Jamaican church responded to the complex challenges of HIV/AIDS in a changing society?
April 1, 2014 / truthAtlas
Kem Knapp Sawyer, Jon Sawyer
Street kids are used to living from lie to lie—often penniless, some are orphans and others shunned as witches. In Kinshasa many seek refuge at ORPER where every child is considered "a jewel."
March 28, 2014 / The Atlantic
Jeffrey E. Stern
What does an airport say about a country? More than you might think.
March 26, 2014 / truthAtlas
Kem Knapp Sawyer, Jon Sawyer
At StandProud, a center for youth with physical disabilities, a 15-year old with polio learns to walk. Others play soccer for the first time.
March 24, 2014
Tom Hundley
Politics in Russia has always made for interesting theater, the current crisis in Crimea being no exception.
March 17, 2014
Mattathias Schwartz
Pulitzer Center grantee Mattathias Schwartz visits D.C. schools to discuss the effects of the U.S."war on drugs" in one country along the supply route and the dangers of vilifying people and places.
March 3, 2014 / Untold Stories
Larry C. Price
Small-scale gold mining is the largest source of mercury emissions produced by humans. In Indonesia child miners are exposed to mercury which can cause tremors, memory loss, and brain damage.
February 28, 2014 / Untold Stories
Larry C. Price
Child miners are exposed to highly toxic mercury which can be absorbed through the skin, ingested in food and water, or inhaled from vapors.
February 27, 2014 / Untold Stories
Roger Thurow
Diego Sarat didn't know what a goat was when his wife signed up for a new nutrition program in Guatemala. He soon discovered it would be a turning point in the health of his children.
February 24, 2014
Jon Sawyer
Great photography is a Pulitzer Center hallmark and so is reporting of depth and insight, sometimes on stories in the news and sometimes on issues that should be.
February 24, 2014 / Untold Stories
Kerstin Egenhofer
In Malawi, students drop out in droves because they can't afford the cost of staying in school. Giving money directly to the poorest students could be one way to keep them in the classroom.
February 21, 2014 / Untold Stories
Kate Riley
Ecuador's government is pushing for a "culture of quality" that emphasizes higher education and improved academic rigor. However, freedom to choose a path of study is not guaranteed.
February 21, 2014
Claire Gillespie
In one of 45 states to adopt Common Core standards, Illinois administrators, teachers, parents, students and legislators respond to the new policy in ways that belie the national reaction.

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