Public Health

Public health focuses on the systematic prevention of disease and prolonging of life by governments, NGO’s and other groups. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Public Health” feature reporting on communicable and non-communicable diseases, the development of medical systems and infrastructure to provide public access to health care services. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on public health.


When BRCA Mutations Meet Complications

Hrafnhildur Sveinbjörnsdóttir had a double mastectomy after finding out she had a gene mutation linked to a high risk of breast cancer. But trying to avoid illness cost her her health.

A Interminável Emergência da Zika

As desigualdades estruturais expostas e pioradas pela epidamia da Zika no Brasil são majoritariamente abarcadas por mulheres já marginalizadas, que agora são cuidadoras de crianças com a SCZ.

A Bot to Watch Over Me

By 2025, Japan will face a shortage of 37,700 care workers. Robots are starting to find their way to households and nursing homes to fill the gap.

February 06, 2018

Aging Crisis in Japan

Shiho Fukada

This project examines social and economic crises in a super-aging Japan.

December 11, 2017

Rohingya Under Attack

Kristen Gelineau, Todd Pitman, Maye-e Wong, Rishabh Raj Jain

"All I have left are my words," the Rohingya Muslim refugee said. The AP documents systematic gang rape of Rohingya women by the Myanmar military, and reconstructs a massacre in one Rohingya village.

November 30, 2017

Women's Rights in Poland

Alex Cocotas

After a failed attempt to completely ban abortion, a look at the ongoing reality of women's rights in Poland.

November 10, 2017

A High-Impact Health Solution in Nigeria

T.R. Goldman

Here’s how one Nigerian state tackled the deadly bacterial infections that kill hundreds of thousands of babies worldwide each year—and why such a seemingly simple solution is so tough to pull off.

October 31, 2017

Iran's Victims of Nerve Agent Warfare

Richard Stone

During the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s, chemical weapons killed or sickened tens of thousands of Iranians. Studies of the survivors are helping to prepare for—or even deter—future attacks.

October 25, 2017

El Salvador: Sex Ed in the Time of Zika

Lauryn Claassen

In El Salvador abortion is illegal, violence against women common, and sex ed extremely limited. Did the Zika virus provide an opportunity for the country to talk about these culturally taboo topics?

October 18, 2017

Puerto Rico: Crisis in the Caribbean

Ryan Michalesko

Weeks after Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico, the island continues its battle for food, water and electricity. Ryan Michalesko reports on the fate of this U.S. territory and its people.

October 13, 2017

What Is Left for Venezuelans?

Lila Franco

Venezuela is facing its biggest crisis yet: a high inflation rate, shortage of food and medicine, and abuse of power by authorities. And that's only part of the picture.

September 25, 2017

Iceland: Ethical Challenges of Genetic Testing

Anna Marsibil Clausen

Genetic scientists in Iceland want to warn 2,400 people who are more likely than others to develop breast cancer, but they can't. The individuals have the right not to know.

Meet the Journalist: Melissa Noel

As they immigrate for a chance to provide for their famlies, parents are leaving their children behind in Jamaica—possibly creating a mental health problem among Jamaican youth.

Meet the Journalist: Mark Johnson

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Mark Johnson and photojournalist Mark Hoffman traveled to Brazil, Kenya, and Uganda to report on the threat of zoonotic diseases long associated with poverty.


Meet the Journalist: James Whitlow Delano

Post-NAFTA Mexico was flooded with cheap sugary, fatty junk food from the U.S.–triggering a dual crisis: obesity and malnutrition. As NAFTA renegotiations progress, will these crises come up at all?

Meet the Journalist: T.R. Goldman

What does it take for a developing country like Nigeria to roll out a new healthcare protocol for newborns on a national scale? T.R. Goldman discusses the challenges this country faces.

Meet the Journalist: David Scales

Scales travels to Nancy and Strasbourg to understand how the new French plan to combat Lyme and tick-borne diseases was unfolding. Here, he shares some surprises he found along the way.

This Week: Contagion That Travels by Plane

This week: How poor hygiene on planes leads to the spread of dangerous communicable diseases, how Sámi people are caught between a climate change solution and their own livelihoods, and how you can double your holiday gift to the Pulitzer Center.

"The End of AIDS?" Wins an Emmy

Another big win PBS NewsHour, Science, and the Pulitzer Center, for "The End of AIDS?" Finding new ways to tell stories that matter on issues that affect us all.

Telling Science Stories: Data Visualization

This lesson shows students how journalists use data visualization to effectively communicate scientific issues—and directs students to create their own projects using the mapping platform CartoDB.

Exploring Other Countries

In this lesson, students use the Pulitzer Center website to research a specific country before giving an oral presentation. 

How to Write a Commentary

In this lesson, students listen to a journalist discuss their reporting and then write a commentary. Students were expected to ask questions, take plenty of notes, and come up with a thesis...

Conviction Driven 'Miracles'

After reading Erik Vance's The Science Behind Miracles, students discuss what it means to have a “limitless” world and whether or not science has anything to do with achieving the impossible.