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Public Health

Public health focuses on the systematic prevention of disease and prolonging of life by governments, NGO’s and other groups. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Public Health” feature reporting on communicable and non-communicable diseases, the development of medical systems and infrastructure to provide public access to health care services. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on public health.

 

The World's Most Common Contraception Has a Dark Past

In India, many women have died getting sterilized—but it remains the most widespread contraceptive method both there and in the rest of the world. Why is it so popular, and what are the drawbacks?

The New Battle for London's Air

London already waged one battle for its air nearly six decades ago. The war, however, isn't yet over. A rise in pollution threatens the city and its most vulnerable residents yet again.

How Cape Town Defeated Day Zero—for Now

Reporting from Cape Town, South Africa, Jacqueline Flynn explores the reality of living with Level 6 water restrictions and the little changes that made the biggest difference for Capetonians during the water crisis.

Cape Town Water Crisis: A Timeline

What were the first signs of a looming water crisis in Cape Town? What restrictions were placed on residents? And how did Capetonians reduce their water consumption?

September 11, 2018

The Future of Family Planning in India

Hannah Harris Green

India will soon be the most populous country in the world. Innovators throughout the country are creating new tools to help families stay small while taking control of their reproductive destinies.

August 30, 2018

Lessons from the Cape Town Water Crisis

Jacqueline Flynn

Cape Town, South Africa, has saved its 3.7 million citizens from becoming very thirsty—for now. What lessons can the world learn about handling drought?

August 09, 2018

Breathtaking: Gasping for Air Across the Globe

Larry C. Price

Airborne particles—sometimes much smaller than the width of a human hair—are not just contributing to climate change. They are a leading driver of serious illness the world over.

July 30, 2018

Losing Earth

Nathaniel Rich, George Steinmetz

Thirty years ago, we could have saved the planet. The world was ready to act. But we failed to do what was necessary to avoid a catastrophe.

July 12, 2018

Cape Town's Water Crisis

Brett Walton

After three years of severe drought, Cape Town’s water supply is at the brink of failure. How do leaders and residents respond to an era of unreliable water?

July 05, 2018

Detained, Deported, Deserted

Sylvia Varnham O’Regan

New Zealanders make up the largest group of people inside Australian detention centers, and hundreds have been deported in recent years—an issue that’s causing mounting social and political tensions.

June 11, 2018

Far from Over

Jon Cohen, William Brangham, Jason Kane, Misha Friedman

Tools are now available to prevent and treat HIV infections, but Russia, Nigeria and the U.S. state of Florida each are struggling, for different reasons, to fully exploit the power of these tools.

June 07, 2018

Oriol Mitjà Plans End to Yaws Disease

Brian Cassey, Martin Enserink

A young Catalan physician-scientist working on a remote island in Papua New Guinea has single-handedly revived the old quest to eradicate yaws, a disfiguring skin and bone disease.

Meet the Journalist: Deborah Bloom

In a densely populated village outside Mombasa in Kenya, the effects of industrial pollution continue to harm inhabitants. Deborah Bloom chronicles an activist's fight against it.

Meet the Journalist: Jon Cohen

Nigeria, Russia, and Florida have each had difficulty mounting a strong response to HIV/AIDS, at a time when neighboring countries or states have made progress in bringing their epidemics to an end.

Meet the Journalist: Nsikan Akpan

The placebo effect influences all types of healing, from acupuncture to laying of hands to the doctor's office. Science producer for PBS NewsHour Nsikan Akpan journeyed from Mexico to Maryland to learn how it works.

Meet the Journalist: Ricardo Martínez

Grantee Ricardo Martínez spent two weeks at 4,300 meters near Cerro de Pasco, Peru. There, almost 100,000 people have to endure heavy metal pollution every day as it leeches into a 936km2 watershed—and many kids are dying.

Meet the Journalist: John Yang

Pulitzer Center grantees John Yang and Frank Carlson investigate the imprisonment of mentally ill Americans, efforts to seek alternative treatments, and the struggle to provide the poor with public defenders.

Meet the Journalist: Melissa Noel

As they immigrate for a chance to provide for their famlies, parents are leaving their children behind in Jamaica—possibly creating a mental health problem among Jamaican youth.

Meet the Journalist: Mark Johnson

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Mark Johnson and photojournalist Mark Hoffman traveled to Brazil, Kenya, and Uganda to report on the threat of zoonotic diseases long associated with poverty.

 

Meet the Journalist: James Whitlow Delano

Post-NAFTA Mexico was flooded with cheap sugary, fatty junk food from the U.S.–triggering a dual crisis: obesity and malnutrition. As NAFTA renegotiations progress, will these crises come up at all?

Meet the Journalist: T.R. Goldman

What does it take for a developing country like Nigeria to roll out a new healthcare protocol for newborns on a national scale? T.R. Goldman discusses the challenges this country faces.

This Week: Family Divided at the Border

This week: reunification dreams stall due to continuing crisis along the border, Cape Town's water issues run deep, and Bhopal's 34-year-old environmental disaster still plagues residents.

This Week: Cracking the Indian Patriarchy

A poor school for girls in rural India reshapes the role of women, how Iraq's legal institutions are struggling to give closure to victims, and HIV's hold on Nigeria, Russia, and Florida.

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