Tags

Politics

From democracies to authoritarian regimes, government policies can have life and death stakes for citizens. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Politics” feature reporting on elections, political corruption, systems of government and political conflict. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on politics.

 

When the Presses Stop

Bernie Krisher helped bring free journalism to Cambodia. Now, as the country reverts to autocracy, his paper has been shut down. Will he survive the heartbreak? Will Cambodia?

Manipur: Portraits of Resilience

Portraits of Resilience takes viewers up close to nine individuals to understand the delicate relationship between the Meiteis and the Loktak Wetland as well as their fight for survival.

December 15, 2017

Inter(Nation)al

Isaac Kestenbaum, Allison Herrera, Josephine Holtzman

Inter(Nation)al ​explores current events through the lens of treaties signed between the U.S. Government and Native Nations. These treaties bind all of us—legally and culturally.

December 14, 2017

Border Fence Land Grab

Julian Aguilar, Kiah Collier

Donald Trump's promised border wall will involve taking land from hundreds of people. An earlier land grab to build border fencing was rushed, sloppy, and gave landowners wildly differing payments.

December 08, 2017

Cambodian Democracy in Crisis

Molly Ball

Earlier this year, pressure from Cambodia's government forced the Cambodia Daily to close its operations. This profile tracks the Daily ’s founder as he makes a final attempt to save his newspaper.

December 07, 2017

Barbuda's Communal Land Ownership

Gregory Scruggs

In September, Hurricane Irma leveled the island of Barbuda and all 1,800 residents were evacuated. Now, redevelopment and the end of collective land ownership threaten to keep them off their land.

November 30, 2017

Women's Rights in Poland

Alex Cocotas

After a failed attempt to completely ban abortion, a look at the ongoing reality of women's rights in Poland.

November 29, 2017

The Hustlers' Embassy

Yepoka Yeebo

The embassy was in a run down colonial building. President Obama's portrait was on the wall. The visas cost $6,000. Only one problem: none of it was real.

November 04, 2017

Paradise Papers

Alvaro Ortiz, Rocco Fazzari

ICIJ's global investigation that reveals the offshore activities of some of the world’s most powerful people and companies.

October 25, 2017

Colombia's Hot Moment

Lisa Palmer

Much is riding on the race to identify and distribute the biological diversity of areas occupied by civil war that the government of Colombia will be receiving as part of the peace deal.

September 26, 2017

A New Era in Cuban Migration

José Antonio Iglesias, Mario J. Pentón, Luis Trelles, Rolando Arrieta

The Obama administration’s decision to end the "wet foot, dry foot" policy has created a migration and humanitarian crisis in Central and South America and a new era in Cuban migration.

September 05, 2017

C.A.R. Crisis: When the State Is Absent

Cassandra Vinograd

As the Central African Republic slips back into chaos, the government is mostly powerless to intervene. Armed groups hold the power. Here's what happens—and who steps in—when state authority is absent.

August 31, 2017

The U.S.-China Nuclear Rapprochement

Richard Stone

An extraordinary collaboration between U.S. and Chinese nuclear scientists is setting the stage for greater cooperation between the two countries in addressing security threats.

Meet the Journalist: Yepoka Yeebo

For over a decade, there existed a fake U.S. Embassy in Accra, Ghana. When the news broke, there were more questions than answers and some officials are convinced it didn't happen.

Meet the Journalist: Peter Gwin

How does a country fail? Peter Gwin spent three years traveling to the Central African Republic to look at how a rebellion destroyed the nation and what's happened to its wealth of resources.

Meet the Journalist: Vince Beiser

"The most important solid substance on earth," Vince Beiser tells us, is sand—used to build skyscrapers and shopping malls from Boston to Beijing. But the world is running out.

Meet the Journalist: Kai Schultz

Kai Schultz reports from the Maldives on its transition to democracy, the misappropriation of tourist taxes, safety at resorts, and the growing fear of Islamic radicalization.

Meet the Journalist: Rachel Oswald

CQ Roll Call foreign policy reporter Rachel Oswald discusses her summer 2015 Pulitzer Center reporting trip to Moscow where she focused on the breakdown in U.S.-Russia nuclear confidence.

This Week: Rohingya, The Lost Genocide

This week: As the world looks upon the Rohingya's plight, a refusal to acknowledge genocide; the fight to list mental health as a global health challenge; and the arduous process of finding schools for special needs children while abroad.

This Week: Where Domestic Abuse Is Tolerated

This week: a harrowing look into Russian domestic violence, a special investigation into how Jewish Federations spend their money, and how Qatar is jailing new mothers and their babies.

This Week: Friends With Dictators

This week: The U.S.'s troublesome alliances with African dictators, Pulitzer tackles homophobia through NewsArts, and the true meaning of the Iraqi Kurdish referendum.