Tags

Politics

From democracies to authoritarian regimes, government policies can have life and death stakes for citizens. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Politics” feature reporting on elections, political corruption, systems of government and political conflict. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on politics.

 

The Lost Genocide

The Rohingya have been stripped of citizenship, prevented from having children, and systematically murdered. But the United Nations may never be able to prosecute the Rohingya genocide.

Capital Offenses

Under President Rodrigo Duterte, thousands have died at the hands of police or the masked vigilantes who roam Manila's vast slums.

November 04, 2017

Paradise Papers

Alvaro Ortiz, Rocco Fazzari

ICIJ's global investigation that reveals the offshore activities of some of the world’s most powerful people and companies.

October 25, 2017

Colombia's Hot Moment

Lisa Palmer

Much is riding on the race to identify and distribute the biological diversity of areas occupied by civil war that the government of Colombia will be receiving as part of the peace deal.

September 26, 2017

A New Era in Cuban Migration

José Antonio Iglesias, Mario J. Pentón, Luis Trelles, Rolando Arrieta

The Obama administration’s decision to end the "wet foot, dry foot" policy has created a migration and humanitarian crisis in Central and South America and a new era in Cuban migration.

September 05, 2017

C.A.R. Crisis: When the State Is Absent

Cassandra Vinograd

As the Central African Republic slips back into chaos, the government is mostly powerless to intervene. Armed groups hold the power. Here's what happens—and who steps in—when state authority is absent.

August 31, 2017

The U.S.-China Nuclear Rapprochement

Richard Stone

An extraordinary collaboration between U.S. and Chinese nuclear scientists is setting the stage for greater cooperation between the two countries in addressing security threats.

July 28, 2017

In Defiance and In Defense of Duterte

Ana P. Santos, James Whitlow Delano

What happens to civil society in a country that democratically elects a leader who encourages the summary executions of citizens for drug addiction and the wholesale violation of human rights?

July 11, 2017

Inside Russia

Nick Schifrin, Zach Fannin

PBS NewsHour goes inside Russia for a series that explores everything from the bilateral relationship with the United States to ascendant nationalism, widespread propaganda, and the fate of the President Vladimir Putin’s enemies.

July 03, 2017

Alone and In Limbo: Child Refugees in Sweden

Amy Russo

Thousands of lone minors fled war to find shelter in Sweden, a once exceptionally welcoming country. Now, asylum regulations are tightening, leaving refugees uncertain of the future.

June 15, 2017

Saudi Arabia's Year of Change

Elizabeth Dickinson

Tumultuous reform at home and aggressive foreign policy abroad spell dramatic change for a conservative Kingdom.

June 05, 2017

Venezuela: Toward Collapse

Nadja Drost, Bruno Federico

As Venezuela’s social and economic crisis deepens, thousands of citizens are taking to the streets. Meanwhile, a quieter humanitarian one is unfolding as hunger and malnutrition spread.

Meet the Journalist: Peter Gwin

How does a country fail? Peter Gwin spent three years traveling to the Central African Republic to look at how a rebellion destroyed the nation and what's happened to its wealth of resources.

Meet the Journalist: Vince Beiser

"The most important solid substance on earth," Vince Beiser tells us, is sand—used to build skyscrapers and shopping malls from Boston to Beijing. But the world is running out.

Meet the Journalist: Kai Schultz

Kai Schultz reports from the Maldives on its transition to democracy, the misappropriation of tourist taxes, safety at resorts, and the growing fear of Islamic radicalization.

Meet the Journalist: Rachel Oswald

CQ Roll Call foreign policy reporter Rachel Oswald discusses her summer 2015 Pulitzer Center reporting trip to Moscow where she focused on the breakdown in U.S.-Russia nuclear confidence.

This Week: Rohingya, The Lost Genocide

This week: As the world looks upon the Rohingya's plight, a refusal to acknowledge genocide; the fight to list mental health as a global health challenge; and the arduous process of finding schools for special needs children while abroad.

This Week: Where Domestic Abuse Is Tolerated

This week: a harrowing look into Russian domestic violence, a special investigation into how Jewish Federations spend their money, and how Qatar is jailing new mothers and their babies.

This Week: Friends With Dictators

This week: The U.S.'s troublesome alliances with African dictators, Pulitzer tackles homophobia through NewsArts, and the true meaning of the Iraqi Kurdish referendum.