January 11, 2009 /
This Gateway provides compelling material related to the role of women in society and the impact of industrialization and international development on women, children, and families.
The remains of a large cargo ship marooned on the dried-out seabed of Lake Urmia. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.
September 30, 2016 / Vox
Ako Salemi, Yochi Dreazen
One of Iran's best known lakes is disappearing. These photos show what's left behind as the waters recede.
Coca leaves drying in the Chapare, Bolivia. Image by Simon Tegel.  Bolivia, 2016.
September 21, 2016 / VICE News
Simeon Tegel
By legalizing coca- the key ingredient in cocaine--Bolivia has reduced crops and narco-conflict. But Washington disapproves.
A view of Baku Bay. Image by Alix Saz courtesy Creative Commons. Azerbaijan, 2015.
September 19, 2016 / PRI's The World
Joshua Kucera
Joshua Kucera explores the border between Europe and Asia, reporting here from Azerbaijan.
"We Are Europe" poster of Trump and Johnson kissing. Image by Amir Hassan. UK, 2016.
September 14, 2016 / Untold Stories
Amir Hassan
Traveling to Manchester, UK, to report on how Muslims are dealing with Islamophobia, Amir Hassan discovered a country reacting in shock to Brexit—news that Britain would leave the European Union.
African lion via public domain.
September 12, 2016 / ICIJ
Will Fitzgibbon, Alvaro Ortiz
Will Fitzgibbon and Álvaro Ortiz take you behind the scenes in the making of Continent of Secrets: Uncovering Africa's Offshore Empires.
Anti-coup protestors in Istanbul. Image courtesy of Maurice Flesier via Wikimedia Commons. Turkey, July, 2016.
September 11, 2016 / The New York Review of Books
Christopher de Bellaigue
July 15, when the supporters of President Erdogan foiled a coup attempt against him, may have been a turning point in Turkish history, opening the way to despotism but entrenching civilian rule.
Ian Johnson interview
September 9, 2016
Ian Johnson, Sim Chi Yin
China's leading thinkers, activists, artists, and authors talk about the future of their country.
The Ataturk memorial statue in Istanbul's Taksim Square on the night of the coup
September 4, 2016
Christopher de Bellaigue
The failed coup of July 15 brought Turks together to defeat an anti-democratic action by the military. But these events have left President Erdogan stronger—and more anti-Western—than ever.
Erdogan speaking as Prime Minister of Turkey. Photo courtesy of google images.
September 4, 2016 / The Guardian
Christopher de Bellaigue
It's commonly argued that President Erdogan's regime is a perversion of democratic norms. In fact, in the light of burgeoning populism around the world, his demokrasi is the new normal.
Khartoum, Sudan
August 24, 2016 / ACAMS Moneylaundering.com
Kira Zalan
Now that Sudan has been cut off from global banking, the buzz in Khartoum is that American officials may be ready to roll back sanctions that have been in place for nearly 20 years.
Hajaj refugees
August 23, 2016
Tom Hundley
Reactions to "Fractured Lands," the last leprosy patients in Sri Lanka, and the health effects of the Olympics in this week's newsletter.
IDP Camp
August 22, 2016
Patrick Reilly, Scott Anderson, Paolo Pellegrin, Ben Solomon
Landmark reporting project with The New York Times Magazine strikes a chord with readers around the world.

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