May 26, 2015 / The Washington Post
Dan Zak
Nuclear talks at UN end in failure amid strife over Israel, a proposed Middle East ban on WMD and attacks on the failure of nuclear-weapons states to take meaningful steps toward disarmament.
May 26, 2015 /
Dan Zak
Seven decades ago the Marshall Islands felt what nuclear war would be like. This century they're grappling with the legacy of U.S. bomb tests—while staring down a new threat driven by climate change.
May 15, 2015 / Time
Elizabeth Dickinson
The White House reassured Gulf countries over talks with Iran. But in Saudi Arabia, worries about Tehran have little to do with nuclear weapons.
February 16, 2015
Tom Hundley, Dimiter Kenarov
Crimea is no longer celebrating its reunion with Russia.
February 8, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Dimiter Kenarov
No tourists, frightened Tatars, and Russians have taken all the jobs. Welcome to Crimea in winter.
January 6, 2015 / Virginia Quarterly Review
Dimiter Kenarov, Boryana Katsarova
Two performances seem to be taking place in parallel: one inside the theater with actors, and another in the streets outside with soldiers in green balaclavas and no recognizable insignia.
December 5, 2014
Joshua Hammer
Joshua Hammer discuses his experience in Mali while working on his project, "Taking Timbuktu: Music, Manuscripts and Madness at the Edge of the Sahara."
November 10, 2014 / The Washington Post
Yana Paskova
As depopulation saps Bulgaria, severe structural and industrial decay become increasingly common.
October 24, 2014 / The New Yorker
Jason Larkin
Pulitzer Center grantee Jason Larkin traveled to Marikana, South Africa, to follow up on the 2012 massacre that left 34 striking miners dead at the hands of government security forces.
September 9, 2014 / The New York Review of Books
Richard Bernstein
Among the many recent stories concerning foreigners setting out to fight in Syria, the allegations about the Uighurs arrested in Thailand are the most curious.
August 22, 2014
Ty McCormick
Less than three years after independence, South Sudan collapsed into civil war. Thousands have died and famine looms on the horizon. Can rebel-leaders-turned-politicians lead the way to peace?
August 11, 2014 / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Meg Jones, Meghan Dhaliwal
Convoys in combat zones soon could include remotely controlled vehicles, which intrigues Wisconsin National Guard members helping to wind down the war in Afghanistan.
August 8, 2014 / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Meg Jones, Meghan Dhaliwal
MIlwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Meg Jones and Pulitzer Center photographer Meghan Dhaliwal embed with a Wisconsin National Guard unit in Afghanistan who are busy packing up a war.

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