January 11, 2009 /
This Gateway provides compelling material related to the role of women in society and the impact of industrialization and international development on women, children, and families.
Ben Freeth returns to the ruins of his home, which was burned down in 2009. Image by Martin Fletcher. Zimbabwe, 2017.
January 20, 2017 / International Business Times
Martin Fletcher
Ben Freeth's family farm was Zimbabwe's biggest mango producer until Robert Mugabe's 'war vets' seized it in 2009. Now, as millions of Zimbabweans survive on foreign food aid, it produces nothing.
Nuclear power plant in Cattenom, France. Image by Stefan Kühn courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. France, 2005.
January 17, 2017 /
Tom Hundley
This week: nuclear power's role in combatting global warming, the hidden lives of migrant workers, and what America gave El Salvador.
Close to 40 men and women sit around a table and share a meal inside the kitchen of the shelter.
January 13, 2017
Xyza Bacani
Singapore is a prosperous country in Asia and migrant workers have played an important role in its success, but at what cost?
A church in Singapore where some migrant workers worship. Image by Xyza Bacani. Singapore, 2016.
January 12, 2017 / The New York Times
Xyza Bacani
Migrant workers are invisible people,We are like air. People need us but they don’t see us. We exist to please them, to serve them, but they don’t really see us as part of the society.
January 9, 2017 / New Security Beat
Nikita Sampath
Rising sea levels and intense cyclones have turned the drinking water saline in coastal Bangladesh. The villagers cope the best they can.
@Jostfranko follows the path of cotton from growers and harvesters in Burkina Faso to production in Bangladesh and Romania, and finally Western Europe in the form of retail garments. Image by Jost Franko. 2016.
January 9, 2017 / Open Society Foundation
Jošt Franko, Meta Krese
Open Society Foundations instagram takeover with the Global supply chain of cotton industry project
Carrying cotton to the collection point in Diongolo, Burkina Faso. Image by Jošt Franko. Burkina Faso, 2016
January 5, 2017
Meta Krese, Jošt Franko
Meta Krese and Jost Franko discuss today’s globalized economy by connecting growers of cotton from Burkina Faso, the garment industry in Bangladesh, and European consumers.
Mbolwa Divele fears a mine would endanger his way of life by destroying grazing land. Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
January 2, 2017 / Saturday Star - IOL
Mark Olalde
Communal land rights often hamper South Africans' claims to the profits from some regions. In the villages around Xolobeni in the Eastern Cape, this battle continues over a proposed titanium mine.
December 24, 2016 / Untold Stories
Meta Krese
What would change for farmers in Burkina Faso who rely on manual labor if they knew they were competing against farmers in the U.S. who use machines for pressing cotton bales?
Workers are seen in a garment factory in Mirpur area in Dhaka. The factory employs 1200 workers, who mostly produce jeans and jackets. Image by Jost Franko. Bangladesh, 2016.
December 23, 2016 / Untold Stories
Meta Krese
Those who work in Bangladesh's textile industry know that a change in public opinion in the West could mean that they are out of a job.
Image by Emily Kassie. Turkey, 2016.
December 23, 2016
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.
Local farmers load the cotton onto the Sofitex containers at the collection center, near Boro. Image by Jost Franko. Burkina Faso, 2015.
December 23, 2016 / Untold Stories
Jošt Franko
Photographer Jost Franko follows the path of cotton in Burkina Faso, Bangladesh and Slovenia, where he finds farmers and textile workers who are often struggling—underpaid or mistreated.

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