Tags

Labor

A person’s labor is deeply intertwined with their economic status, quality of life and access to basic resources like food and clothing. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Labor” feature reporting that covers the rights of workers, efforts to organize labor unions and worker advocacy groups, modern slavery, and other forms of worker exploitation. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on labor.

 

January 12, 2017|

'Invisible' Domestic Workers In Singapore

Migrant workers are invisible people,We are like air. People need us but they don’t see us. We exist to please them, to serve them, but they don’t really see us as part of the society.

December 24, 2016|

Picking Cotton in Burkina Faso

What would change for farmers in Burkina Faso who rely on manual labor if they knew they were competing against farmers in the U.S. who use machines for pressing cotton bales?

December 23, 2016|

Rana Plaza Today

Those who work in Bangladesh's textile industry know that a change in public opinion in the West could mean that they are out of a job.

February 17, 2017

The Impacts of Privatization on Israelis and Palestinians

Miriam Berger

Journalist Miriam Berger reports on the impact of privatization policies on Israeli and Palestinian security, labor, and welfare sectors—among the most important, and overlooked, developments shaping Israel-Palestine today.

With the peace process at a stalemate and economic and political malaise deeply afflicting both sides, shifts in power between public...

January 13, 2017

Singapore Runaways

Xyza Bacani

Singapore is a prosperous country in Asia and migrant workers have played an important role in its success, but at what cost?

December 23, 2016

Refugee Boom and Bust: A Global Gold Rush

Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie

From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.

December 12, 2016

Hard Labor/High Culture

Negar Azimi, Knut Egil Wang

The world’s leading architects, the most vulnerable laborers, and a movement of concerned artists converge on a man-made island in the Persian Gulf called Saadiyat, which means “happiness” in Arabic.

October 27, 2016

Corporate Armies

Matt Kennard, Claire Provost

A massive army has been built up around the world, not to fight traditional wars, but to protect corporate assets around the world.

June 13, 2016

The “War on Drugs” in South America

Simeon Tegel

US-led prohibition has exacted a high toll in Latin America. This project explores the impacts on communities in Bolivia and Paraguay, whose principal cash crops are coca and cannabis respectively.

April 25, 2016

Brick by Brick: Reforming South Asia’s Brick Kilns

Michael Holtz, Ann Hermes, Fred de Sam Lazaro, Richard Coolidge

Brick making across India and Nepal has long relied on bonded and child labor. What will it take to clean up an industry so rife with abuse?

April 19, 2016

The Labor Train

George Butler, Joseph Schottenfeld, Tim Brown

An intimate profile of labor migrants making their way to Russia by train and bracing for—sometimes looking forward to—work and life in Moscow.

March 10, 2016

Niger: Baho's Last Fight

Jillian Keenan

Poverty and unemployment have driven some youth in southern Niger to form violent gangs known as palais—attractive recruitment targets for Boko Haram. But one man is fighting back.

January 05, 2016

Saudi Arabia's First Female Lawyers

Katherine Zoepf

In 2013, the Saudi justice ministry began permitting female lawyers to appear in court. How is the entry of Saudi women into the legal field affecting perceptions of women's rights in the kingdom?