Human Rights

According to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. And yet around the world, many people are denied basic human rights, or find their rights under threat. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Human Rights” feature reporting that covers the fight for equality under the law, civil rights and the basic dignity afforded every person. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on human rights.


March 22, 2018

Mugabe's Last Days—And What Comes Next

Joshua Hammer

Robert Mugabe's downfall after 37 years in power left beleaguered Zimbabweans euphoric, but the rise of Emmanuel Mnangagwa, aka The Crocodile, suggests that the rejoicing might be premature.

January 16, 2018

The Center Cannot Hold

Jack Losh

Five years since war erupted, the Central African Republic is again spiralling out of control, with families caught in a deepening humanitarian crisis. How do you survive when your country is collapsing?

January 12, 2018

Bolivian Youth: In Harm's Way

Tracey Eaton

Bolivia can be a rough place for children, especially the most vulnerable. Bolivian President Evo Morales takes pride in protecting youth, but critics question whether he has done enough.

December 11, 2017

The Rohingya Crisis

Nahal Toosi

Did the United States ignore signs of a coming mass atrocity against the Rohingya when it chose to upgrade its relationship with Myanmar and lift sanctions on the country?

December 11, 2017

Rohingya Under Attack

Kristen Gelineau, Todd Pitman, Maye-e Wong, Rishabh Raj Jain

"All I have left are my words," the Rohingya Muslim refugee said. The AP documents systematic gang rape of Rohingya women by the Myanmar military, and reconstructs a massacre in one Rohingya village.

December 08, 2017

Cambodian Democracy in Crisis

Molly Ball

Earlier this year, pressure from Cambodia's government forced the Cambodia Daily to close its operations. This profile tracks the Daily ’s founder as he makes a final attempt to save his newspaper.

November 27, 2017

Witch Hunts in India

Seema Yasmin

Women in India are blamed for economic, agricultural and public health failures, accused of sorcery and subjected to witch hunts resulting in their torture and death.

October 11, 2017

Iran Wins in Iraq

Reza Sayah, Gelareh Kiazand

In a multi-part series for PBS NewsHour , Reza Sayah and Gelareh Kiazand look at Iran’s influence in its war-torn neighbor.

September 04, 2017

Russia: Women Hit Hard by HIV/AIDS

Anna Nemtsova, Sophia Jones

The HIV/AIDS epidemic is at a tipping point in Russia, where an estimated 1-1.5 million people are HIV positive and the Kremlin has long rejected international assistance. Women are being left behind.

August 17, 2017

Syria: The Next Chapter

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

The Syrian war: We see the headlines, but know far less about the people caught in the conflict's crosshairs. What comes next for them, and how will that impact the future of the country and the wider Middle East?

August 03, 2017

Women and Opportunity in Southern India

Praveena Somasundaram

Praveena Somasundaram from Guilford College traveled to southern India to report on gender inequality in education and the difficulties and opportunities women face in the workplace in both urban and rural areas.

Meet the Journalist: Guido Bilbao

Panama is facing a serious environmental threat. Investigations have revealed a serious threat to Panama's natural resources that impacts the country's environment and people.

Meet the Journalist: Fred Pearce

200 environmental and human rights activists are assassinated each year, according to Global Witness. Fred Pearce investigates the headline-grabbing slayings of three of these activists.

Meet the Journalist: James Fenton

James Fenton discusses reporting on President Duterte's violent war on drugs in the Philippines. The number of casualties in a 7-month period reached 7,000 following the president's election.

Meet the Journalist: Ewen MacAskill

Ewen MacAskill visits Villa Grimaldi, a secret detention center in Chile, while uncovering the story of Roberto Kozak, a diplomat who helped save 30,000 prisoners after the 1973 military coup.

This Week: Rohingya, The Lost Genocide

This week: As the world looks upon the Rohingya's plight, a refusal to acknowledge genocide; the fight to list mental health as a global health challenge; and the arduous process of finding schools for special needs children while abroad.

This Week: Where Domestic Abuse Is Tolerated

This week: a harrowing look into Russian domestic violence, a special investigation into how Jewish Federations spend their money, and how Qatar is jailing new mothers and their babies.

Gender Lens: Refugees and Migration

Journalists and activists joined together for a conversation on the impact of gender and gender roles on the refugee experience—exploring how the most vulnerable are affected and how they cope.