Tags

Human Rights

According to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. And yet around the world, many people are denied basic human rights, or find their rights under threat. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Human Rights” feature reporting that covers the fight for equality under the law, civil rights and the basic dignity afforded every person. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on human rights.

 

June 22, 2017|

Convict of 302: Death Penalty in Pakistan

The Pakistani public perceives the reinstatement of the death penalty as a tool to curb terrorism and crime, but many are unaware that not everyone on death row receives a fair trial.

June 05, 2017|

India: Toiling for a Toilet

A sanitation scheme has deepened rural indebtedness and perpetuated migratory labor. Yardain Amron reports on the race to make every open village defecation-free by 2019.

April 09, 2017|

Nigeria's Invisible Crisis

In one of the world's least recognized crises, hunger amplifies disease for millions fleeing the violence of Boko Haram in northeastern Nigeria.

June 15, 2017

A Woman's Crime and Punishment

Ana P. Santos

When unmarried sex is outlawed, pregnancy out of wedlock is proof of a crime. Women are jailed—along with their babies.

June 02, 2017

Canada's Missing and Murdered Women

Joanna Jolly

Over the past three decades, thousands of Canadian Aboriginal women have been murdered or gone missing. The government has begun investigating why indigenous women are so vulnerable to violence.

May 29, 2017

The Black Death of Kabwe

Larry C. Price

Years of unmitigated contamination from Zambia's largest lead mine have created a toxic nightmare for the residents of Kabwe, the country's second largest city.

April 14, 2017

India: Migrating Into Slavery

Yardain Amron

Each winter hundreds of thousands of Indians migrate north to man the world's second largest brick industry. They're promised opportunity, but many are bonded into debt.

January 19, 2017

Duterte and the Philippines

James Fenton

A new president is elected in the Philippines on a promise that he will crack down on drugs, dealers and users. Thousands of poor people have already been killed.

January 02, 2017

A Look Inside South Sudan's Bitter War

Cassandra Vinograd

Mass killings, mass rape, ethnic cleansing, starvation and a lack of international will to act against the specter of genocide: A rare look inside the crisis in South Sudan.

December 23, 2016

Refugee Boom and Bust: A Global Gold Rush

Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie

From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.

December 14, 2016

Latin America's Schindler

Ewen MacAskill

Roberto Kozak is virtually unknown. And yet this quiet man played a crucial role after the 1973 coup in Chile and he helped tens of thousands of prisoners out of custody and to find safe havens overseas.

October 27, 2016

Corporate Armies

Matt Kennard, Claire Provost

A massive army has been built up around the world, not to fight traditional wars, but to protect corporate assets around the world.

October 07, 2016

Ending Female Genital Mutilation in Ethiopia

Amy Yee

Female genital mutilation affects 200 million girls and women worldwide. But in Ethiopia, Bogaletch Gebre's nonprofit has reduced FGM in one region from 97 percent to 3 percent by working within communities.

September 14, 2016

The Italian Roma

Holly Gambrell

This investigation into the lifestyles, struggles and cultures of the Roma people living in Rome examines how the Italian government—and citizens—treat the Roma population.

September 14, 2016

More Than Makeup: Transgender Transparency in Pakistan

Ikra Javed

A third gender lives in Pakistan, earning livelihoods through begging, sex work and dancing. But a closer look uncovers the diverse identities and daily realities comprising this trans community.

February 20, 2017|

Meet the Journalist: James Fenton

James Fenton discusses reporting on President Duterte's violent war on drugs in the Philippines. The number of casualties in a 7-month period reached 7,000 following the president's election.

October 24, 2016|

Meet the Journalist: Mark Johnson

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Mark Johnson discusses his project, "The Healing," on the efforts of a Syrian-born pediatric neurologist to help refugees from Syria who are stuck in the Zaatari camp in Jordan.

June 12, 2017|

Gender Lens: Refugees and Migration

Journalists and activists joined together for a conversation on the impact of gender and gender roles on the refugee experience—exploring how the most vulnerable are affected and how they cope.