Tags

Environment

Around the world, the environment is increasingly under threat from industrial pollution, business development of the wilderness and climate change. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Environment” feature reporting that covers climate change, deforestation, biodiversity, pollution, and other factors that impact the health of the world around us. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on the environment.

 

No Man's Land

One of Indonesia’s biggest agricultural industries is also one of its filthiest. A visit to the palm-oil plantations and the people whose lives are shaped by this demanding crop.

The New Battle for London's Air

London already waged one battle for its air nearly six decades ago. The war, however, isn't yet over. A rise in pollution threatens the city and its most vulnerable residents yet again.

The Unburied Stone

The story of Yoshihama's tsunami stone, borne ashore in 1933 and inscribed with text, buried in 1961 beneath a coastal road, and resurrected by the 2011 tsunami.

Cape Town Water Crisis: A Timeline

What were the first signs of a looming water crisis in Cape Town? What restrictions were placed on residents? And how did Capetonians reduce their water consumption?

Cape Town: Signs of the Water Crisis

For months, street corners, buildings, and bathroom mirrors served as constant reminders for Capetonians of the looming threat of the water crisis and suggested new ways to save water.

September 07, 2018

In These Hills, Our Gods and Our Futures

Raghu Karnad, Arko Datto

In Odisha in eastern India, Arko Datto and Raghu Karnad cover the resistance of Dongria Kondh women to industrial interests that want to exploit their sacred hills for bauxite reserves.

August 30, 2018

The Amazon’s Climate Tipping Point

Sam Eaton

Tropical forests are tipping from carbon sink to source, threatening a crucial hedge against runaway climate change in the violent, corruption-stained Brazilian Amazon.

August 30, 2018

Lessons from the Cape Town Water Crisis

Jacqueline Flynn

Cape Town, South Africa, has saved its 3.7 million citizens from becoming very thirsty—for now. What lessons can the world learn about handling drought?

August 28, 2018

London Smog

Rohan Naik

The city of London is embroiled in a long-standing battle against air pollution. Are its latest efforts enough, or is it too little too late?

August 27, 2018

The 2011 Japan Tsunami

Matthew Komatsu

From the personal to international, examining the long-term cultural impact of the 2011 Japan tsunami.

August 23, 2018

The Race for Cobalt

Vivienne Walt, Sebastian Meyer

Vivienne Walt and Sebastian Meyer traveled to the Democratic Republic of Congo, home to most of the world's cobalt, to see how huge global demand can be met without rampant child labor and corruption.

August 16, 2018

The Mazahua and Mexico's Water Crisis

Meg Vatterott

How does climate change disrupt a vulnerable community's access to water? Meg Vatterot reports on the effect of Mexico City's water crisis on the Mazahua indigenous community.

August 09, 2018

Breathtaking: Gasping for Air Across the Globe

Larry C. Price

Airborne particles—sometimes much smaller than the width of a human hair—are not just contributing to climate change. They are a leading driver of serious illness the world over.

August 07, 2018

A Journey Through Contested Lands: Honduras

Susan Meiselas

Real estate investors are violating the hard-fought land rights of the Garífuna, an Afro-Caribbean community in Honduras whose unique and endangered culture has been recognized by UNESCO.

Meet the Journalist: Deborah Bloom

In a densely populated village outside Mombasa in Kenya, the effects of industrial pollution continue to harm inhabitants. Deborah Bloom chronicles an activist's fight against it.

Meet the Journalist: Ricardo Martínez

Grantee Ricardo Martínez spent two weeks at 4,300 meters near Cerro de Pasco, Peru. There, almost 100,000 people have to endure heavy metal pollution every day as it leeches into a 936km2 watershed—and many kids are dying.

Meet the Journalist: Estacio Valoi

Oxpeckers Investigative Environmental Journalism's Estacio Valoi discusses Kruger's contested borderlands and how he overcame the challenges of reporting in a remote zone by using new media tools.

This Week: Losing Earth

This week: the decade we almost stopped climate change, the U.S.-backed coalition in Yemen is paying Al-Qaeda militants, and Magnum photographers journey through six countries where indigenous people are fighting to keep the rights to their land.

Where Can I Be Safe?

A 12-year old girl questions the fate of the earth at the August 1 launch of the NYT Magazine article, "Losing Earth," by author Nathaniel Rich, at The Times Center in New York.

This Week: Family Divided at the Border

This week: reunification dreams stall due to continuing crisis along the border, Cape Town's water issues run deep, and Bhopal's 34-year-old environmental disaster still plagues residents.

This Week: Torture in Yemen's Prisons

Yemeni detainees being without charges decry abuse, the search for the Tasmanian tiger continues despite its supposed extinction, and the 2016 peace deal in Colombia has opened new areas to scientists.