July 18, 2014 /
Amelia Warshaw, Samuel Loewenberg
Many malnourished children suffer more from poor sanitation than lack of food. Simple things like hand washing, sewage systems, and public latrines could save millions of lives each year.
July 22, 2014 / Untold Stories
Dan Grossman, Alex MacLean
A trillion dollars worth of heavy crude has attracted the world's oil titans to western Canada. The impact is colossal.
July 14, 2014 / Yale Environment 360
He Guangwei
Chinese officials are only starting to come to grips with the severity and extent of the soil pollution that has contaminated vast areas of the nation’s farm fields. Part 3 in He Guangwei's series.
March 21, 2014 / Al Jazeera America
Samuel Loewenberg
More than two-thirds of Kampala's residents rely on pit latrines—and they are overflowing, spreading muck and disease. Entrepreneurs are trying to save the day, and make some money at the same time.
March 17, 2014
Craig Welch, Steve Ringman
Honors for Pulitzer Center-supported Seattle Times ocean acidification series, "Sea Change: The Pacific's Perilous Turn."
March 17, 2014 / MIPJ
Sean Gallagher
MIPJ's latest edition includes an interview with Pulitzer Center grantee and photojournalist Sean Gallagher.
February 28, 2014 / Untold Stories
Chris Berdik, Steve Sapienza
Hydropower promises much-needed power and development to Cambodia. But it's not without costs.
February 23, 2014
Quinn Libson, Glenn Baker, Steve Sapienza
"Easy Like Water," a film that documents one man's mission to help Bangladesh's schools adapt to climate change, attracts notice from television broadcasts.
February 21, 2014
Daniel Casey
Although the government and NGOs think of buffers as the best way to deal with runoff in the Chesapeake Bay, a growing body of evidence suggests otherwise.
February 19, 2014
Ben Depp, Nadja Drost, Mellissa Fung, Dimiter Kenarov, Jacob Kushner, Narayan Mahon, Larry C. Price, Jane Regan, Steve Sapienza, Nadia Shira Cohen, Damon Tabor
Cross continents with eleven of our grantee journalists as they take you into the mines to show you where we get our gold––exposing the hidden social and environmental costs of this business.
February 11, 2014 / Untold Stories
Chris Berdik
The medieval kingdom of Angkor on the shores of Lake Tonle Sap grew in wealth and power by controlling the water, until it all went wrong. What can be learned from this vanished world? A lot.
February 11, 2014 / Untold Stories
Chris Berdik
Dealing with any one of the many threats to Tonle Sap would be daunting. The only real solution may be to take them all on at once.
Image by Chris Berdik. Cambodia, 2013.
February 11, 2014
Chris Berdik, Steve Sapienza
For centuries, the flood pulse of this lake has fed a nation and nurtured incredible biodiversity. With a changing climate and scores of dams planned upstream on the Mekong, can it survive?

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