October 20, 2016 / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Daniel Moore, Michael Henninger
Life in Jamshedpur, founded a century ago as the "steel city" of India, embodies both India's industrial prowess and its challenges with changing energy production and limiting resource consumption.
An NTCL barge and tug on the Mackenzie River. Image by Brian Castner. Canada's Northwest Territories, 2016.
October 19, 2016 / Untold Stories
Brian Castner
After 80 years of service, the Mackenzie River barges succumb to changing economics and climate.
A technician records data on seeds germinated in a lab at ICARDA's facility in Lebanon. Image by Jacob Russell. Lebanon, 2016.
October 19, 2016 /
Jennifer Duggan, Jacob Russell
A research center is rebuilding their seed collection in Lebanon after fleeing Aleppo in Syria. Their collection is of vital importance for global food security in a changing climate.
Wilfred Jackson at home. Image by Brian Castner. Canada, 2016.
October 19, 2016
Jon Sawyer
Growing Isolationism in the arctic, celebrating the Pulitzer Center's 10th anniversary, and India's dilemma of providing electricity to 1.3 billion people.
 ICARDA associate scientist Ali Shehadeh tried to negotiate with rebel groups to maintain ICARDA's seed collection in Syria after the war broke out. Image by Jacob Russell. Lebanon, 2016.
October 18, 2016 / takepart
Jennifer Duggan, Jacob Russell
Scientists with a critical agricultural research organization are among the 11 million people forced to flee Syria's conflict. They took heroic steps to save resources vital for global food security.
Residents in Tuvar,  India, gather in the schoolhouse to hear about a plan to bring solar power to the village. Tuvar is one of many communities in India without access to electricity. Image by Michael Henninger. India, 2016.
October 15, 2016
Daniel Moore, Michael Henninger
Business reporter Daniel Moore and photographer Michael Henninger traveled to India for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette to write about efforts to scale up clean sources of power.
At Philips Lighting in India, Priya Mishra is an engineer pushing for efficiency in a country rapidly consuming resources. Philips markets light emitting diode, or LED, lighting for homes, businesses and city streets. LED technology uses far less energy to produce the same amount of light, extending the life of the bulb, saving money on power bills and lessening dependence on the electric grid. Image by Michael Henninger. India, 2016.
October 14, 2016
Daniel Moore, Michael Henninger
How India is emerging as a proving ground for clean power as the country pledges to electrify rural areas.
Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
October 13, 2016
Mark Olalde
More than 6,000 abandoned mines pierce South African soil, and the nation is now left to deal with the environmental and social rehabilitation from what was once its most important industry.
Wilfred Jackson at home
October 13, 2016 / The Atlantic
Brian Castner
They can see the global culture via satellite television, but cannot touch it, except to purchase the veneer on Amazon.
powered electricity to the village. The village in rural northwestern India uses kerosene and firewood for energy. Image by Michael Henninger. India, 2016.
October 13, 2016 / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Daniel Moore, Michael Henninger
With one in four people without power, India is a proving ground for clean energy. Researchers in Pittsburgh and India are hoping their technology can work—and make money—anywhere in the world.
A stream meanders through a wetland in Wakkerstroom, Mpumalanga. The region is a Strategic Water Source Area, the segments of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland that make up 8 percent of land area but account for 50 percent of water supply. Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
October 12, 2016 / Inter Press Service
Mark Olalde
With South Africa in the midst of a historic drought, the government continues to allow ambitious prospecting for coal mines in water-sensitive areas.
High-voltage power lines carry electricity from coal-fired power plants in Mpumalanga toward Gauteng. Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
October 12, 2016 / Oxpeckers
Mark Olalde
A controversial underground coal mine in a protected water catchment in Mpumalanga has moved closer to breaking ground after it was granted environmental authorisation and a water use licence.
October 11, 2016
Rachel Nuwer
Demand for animals vastly outstrips availability. What are the forces driving the current poaching crisis, what we stand to lose if species fall, and what is being done to stop the killing?