December 3, 2016 /
Nick Schifrin, Zach Fannin
While many in Cuba mourn the passing of Fidel Castro, others are more than ready for change.
Still from PBS NewsHour broadcast, "Cuban Attitudes Toward Castro Range from Devout to Cynical."
December 2, 2016 / PBS NewsHour
Nick Schifrin, Zach Fannin
For many, Castro was a symbol of Cuba's hope for strong leadership in a new era of prosperity. But for others, his legacy represents unfulfilled promises and relentless control.
Carletonville sinkhole
December 1, 2016 / The Star
Mark Olalde
Five decades of mining on the Far West Rand outside Johannesburg contributed to the formation of more than 1,000 sinkholes. As companies abandon mines, many fear this will set off new sinkholes.
November 29, 2016 / PBS NewsHour
Nick Schifrin, Zach Fannin
President-elect Donald Trump has has threatened to pull out of trade agreements with Mexico. How will this affect lives on both sides of the border?
A Donald Trump piñata in the center of Mexico City. Many Mexicans are deeply fearful of Trump's enacting his campaign promises to cancel or alter NAFTA, restrict remittances sent to Mexico from the United States, deport millions of undocumented immigrants living in the U.S., and build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Image by Nick Schifrin. Mexico, 2016.
November 23, 2016
Nick Schifrin, Zach Fannin
Donald Trump has targeted Mexico more than any other country, promising to build a wall, deport millions of Mexicans from the U.S., and cancel NAFTA. PBS NewsHour examines how Mexico is responding.
President Jacob Zuma speaks to Parliament in October about the marine economy. Courtesy: Republic of South Africa. South Africa, 2016.
November 23, 2016 / Inter Press Service
Mark Olalde
Southern Africa finds itself at the center of the offshore bulk sediment mining debate as international companies rush to strip mine phosphate deposits in coastal waters of South Africa and Namibia.
October 27, 2016
Libby Allen
Reporting to focus on impact of sand dredging along their Nigeria's southwest coast.
Image by Alice Su. China, 2016.
October 25, 2016
Tom Hundley
This week, China's growing isolationism and its global influence, a North Korean film festival, and highlights from our student fellows Washington weekend.
October 17, 2016 / The Atlantic
Alice Su
Terror and religious extremism challenge a state unaccustomed to martyrdom narratives. Can a country doing business all over the world really avoid other peoples' politics?
Residents in Tuvar,  India, gather in the schoolhouse to hear about a plan to bring solar power to the village. Tuvar is one of many communities in India without access to electricity. Image by Michael Henninger. India, 2016.
October 15, 2016
Daniel Moore, Michael Henninger
Business reporter Daniel Moore and photographer Michael Henninger traveled to India for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette to write about efforts to scale up clean sources of power.
powered electricity to the village. The village in rural northwestern India uses kerosene and firewood for energy. Image by Michael Henninger. India, 2016.
October 13, 2016 / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Daniel Moore, Michael Henninger
With one in four people without power, India is a proving ground for clean energy. Researchers in Pittsburgh and India are hoping their technology can work—and make money—anywhere in the world.
A stream meanders through a wetland in Wakkerstroom, Mpumalanga. The region is a Strategic Water Source Area, the segments of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland that make up 8 percent of land area but account for 50 percent of water supply. Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
October 12, 2016 / Inter Press Service
Mark Olalde
With South Africa in the midst of a historic drought, the government continues to allow ambitious prospecting for coal mines in water-sensitive areas.
High-voltage power lines carry electricity from coal-fired power plants in Mpumalanga toward Gauteng. Image by Mark Olalde. South Africa, 2016.
October 12, 2016 / Oxpeckers
Mark Olalde
A controversial underground coal mine in a protected water catchment in Mpumalanga has moved closer to breaking ground after it was granted environmental authorisation and a water use licence.

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