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Migrants, Displaced People and Refugees

War, economic crisis and climate change can trigger mass migrations of people. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Migrants, Displaced People and Refugees” feature reporting that covers refugees, migrants and internally displaced people. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on migrants, displaced people and refugees.

 

Up the Creek

Many Liberians wish to come to the U.S., hoping for better opportunities. But those who have been to the U.S., like Chico, realized that grave challenges exist no matter where they go.

The Grace of God

After the civil war, many Liberian youth found themselves at the margins of the society, struggling to get by. Some, like Peter Fayah and David Gibson, survive by relying upon “the grace of God.”

Liberia: Between the Streets and the Stadium

Many Liberians whose limbs have been amputated join the amputee soccer league. While they’ve gained much fame and recognition playing soccer, some of them still live on the streets and beg for money.

Love in the Time of War

Liberia's civil war brought together those who once fought for Charles Taylor. Despite being marginalized after the war, the group has formed strong relationships that can lead to reintegration.

"I Have a Heartache"

Liberians who fled the country as a result of the 14-year civil war had to undergo medical examination upon returning to Robert International Airport in Monrovia, Liberia's capital.

My Little Brother

Although the UNHCR's official repatriation program is over, 65 Liberians who went into exile because of the 14-year civil war were given the opportunity to come home.

A World Apart

It was a day of connections in Liberia for Pulitzer Center grantee Ruthie Ackerman. She met with relatives of Liberians who fled the 14-year civil war and are trying to make a living in Staten Island.

Meet the Tuckers

Four Liberian brothers have grown up on opposite sides of the ocean — two in Staten Island and others in Liberia. But they prove that opportunities and challenges exist in both communities.

Peter and Jion: From Fighters to Friends

Two Liberian friends are former child soldiers who used to fight for opposing sides. Never formally demobilized, both live on the streets of Monrovia, begging for money and food to live.

From Nowhere to Somewhere

Junior Tucker is Isaiah and Kenje Tucker's brother. While his brothers live in Staten Island, Junior stays In Liberia, where he shares the story of difficulties living in the U.S.

We Could Have Died For Less...

Peter and Jion are two young men who are friends today but were former child soldiers who fought on opposing forces during the civil war. Jion lost his left leg, while Peter lost his right arm.

Al-Anbar

Democracy Now!, a daily radio and TV news program, featured on September 11, 2007 David Enders and Rick Rowley's investigative video on Al-Anbar. Amy Goodman interviewed Rick Rowley in a U.S. broadcast exclusive. The video piece is excerpted from an expose that aired on Al Jazeera English.

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