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Culture

Culture rests at the core of how people live their lives and experience the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Culture” feature reporting that covers knowledge, belief, art, morals, law and customs. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on culture.

 

Elections Do Not Mean Democracy

Elections are not a bad thing. But for the sake of our own commitment to honesty, let us not deceive ourselves into believing that Jordan is democratizing.

The Secret Car Horn Language Of Port-Au-Prince

Port-au-Prince, Haiti, is known for its terrible traffic, partly caused by lack of reliable street lights. So drivers there have come up with their own complicated language.

Inside Russia’s Propaganda Machine

For years, the Kremlin and the media it controls have waged a multifaceted disinformation campaign inside Russia and pointed at its perceived adversaries, including the U.S.

Crossing Over

While covering transportation issues in Tijuana, journalist Patrick Reilly crosses the U.S./Mexico border three times—it's not so easy for Tijuanenses.

May 20, 2011

Too Young to Wed: The Secret World of Child Brides

Stephanie Sinclair

Throughout the world, more than 51 million girls below the age of 18 are currently married. This harmful traditional practice spans continents, language, religion and caste.

March 22, 2011

El Salvador: Fighting Drugs with Guns

Roberto Lovato

President Obama wants to put U.S.-Latin America relations on a new path. But his drug and security policies indicate that the more the U.S. stance toward the region changes, the more it stays the same.

March 08, 2011

Afghanistan by Donkey

Anna Badkhen

During the year that is supposed to determine Afghanistan’s future, Anna Badkhen gives readers a longer look at a deeply fissured nation that has endured war almost incessantly for millennia.

February 25, 2011

A Soldier’s Gift

Meg Jones

An American military medical facility has become one of the most active organ donor hospitals in Germany. That’s because a high percentage of mortally wounded U.S. troops are donating their organs in a country where organ donation is still a verboten topic.

September 19, 2010

Lost in Translation: Telling Afghan Stories to the West

Vanessa M. Gezari, Kathleen Flynn

Afghan reporters know things about their country that western reporters miss. Can they convey the complexity of Afghan society, not just across language barriers, but across cultures?

April 10, 2010

Child Sacrifice in Uganda

Marco Vernaschi, Sebastiano Vitale

Searing images capture a disturbing Ugandan trend -- the recent rise of charlatan priests and the child abuse and sometimes murder that have resulted. (This project contains graphic images that may not be suitable for all audiences.)

October 31, 2009

Nunavut, Canada: Hope on Ice

Linda Matchan, Michele McDonald, Susan Gray

In the remote northern reaches of one of the wealthiest countries of the world is an aboriginal community whose young people are slowly perishing by suicide.

September 08, 2009

The Architect of 9/11

Daniel Brook

As an urban planning graduate student at the Hamburg University of Technology, Egyptian architect Mohamed Atta researched what he saw as the intrusions of Western modernist architecture.

July 23, 2009

Greenland: Languages on Thin Ice

Jason George, Christopher Booker

In the arctic, warmer weather has already reshaped fauna and flora zones, and sea ice melted last year at the highest levels in modern history. In fact, some scientists believe that if such thawing continues, North Pole summers will be ice-free by the end of the century.

...

April 01, 2009

Human Terrain: The New Counterinsurgency?

Vanessa M. Gezari

Since 2007, an experimental Pentagon program has been sending teams of civilian anthropologists and other social scientists into the hardest-fought regions of Iraq and Afghanistan to pursue a mission that's both deeply controversial and increasingly important to U.S. military strategy.

Social scientists work within frontline combat units...

This Week: Congo's Peacekeepers

Setting aside a dismal record of failure, incompetence and indifference, UN peacekeeping troops and the Democratic Republic of Congo's army seem to have finally joined forces to protect civilians.

This Week: The Lingering Disaster

Last April, the world was shocked and outraged by the Rana Plaza disaster—a building collapse that claimed the lives of more than 1,200 garment workers in a Dhaka sweatshop. Has anything changed?

This Week: A Moveable Piece

The latest round of US-brokered Israeli-Palestinian peace talks has produced hints of a breakthrough on the most contentious of all issues—the final status of Jerusalem.

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