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Culture

Culture rests at the core of how people live their lives and experience the world. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Culture” feature reporting that covers knowledge, belief, art, morals, law and customs. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on culture.

 

September 19, 2010

Lost in Translation: Telling Afghan Stories to the West

Vanessa M. Gezari, Kathleen Flynn

Afghan reporters know things about their country that western reporters miss. Can they convey the complexity of Afghan society, not just across language barriers, but across cultures?

April 10, 2010

Child Sacrifice in Uganda

Marco Vernaschi, Sebastiano Vitale

Searing images capture a disturbing Ugandan trend -- the recent rise of charlatan priests and the child abuse and sometimes murder that have resulted. (This project contains graphic images that may not be suitable for all audiences.)

October 31, 2009

Nunavut, Canada: Hope on Ice

Linda Matchan, Michele McDonald, Susan Gray

In the remote northern reaches of one of the wealthiest countries of the world is an aboriginal community whose young people are slowly perishing by suicide.

September 08, 2009

The Architect of 9/11

Daniel Brook

As an urban planning graduate student at the Hamburg University of Technology, Egyptian architect Mohamed Atta researched what he saw as the intrusions of Western modernist architecture.

July 23, 2009

Greenland: Languages on Thin Ice

Jason George, Christopher Booker

In the arctic, warmer weather has already reshaped fauna and flora zones, and sea ice melted last year at the highest levels in modern history. In fact, some scientists believe that if such thawing continues, North Pole summers will be ice-free by the end of the century.

...

April 01, 2009

Human Terrain: The New Counterinsurgency?

Vanessa M. Gezari

Since 2007, an experimental Pentagon program has been sending teams of civilian anthropologists and other social scientists into the hardest-fought regions of Iraq and Afghanistan to pursue a mission that's both deeply controversial and increasingly important to U.S. military strategy.

Social scientists work within frontline combat units...

February 15, 2009

India: The Kerala Model

Karl E. Meyer, Shareen Brysac

In few places has coexistence between Muslims and non-Muslims been more sorely tested as in India, yet few post-colonial nations can claim a more unlikely success. Kerala is an exceptionally diverse southern state: 32 million inhabitants, 56 percent Hindu, 25 percent Muslim, 19 percent Christian, plus a scattering of...

December 27, 2008

Mexico: Trouble in Culiacán

Clayton Worlfolk, Jordan deBree

In the last several years, at least one dozen Mexican norteño musicians have been murdered in a wave of violence bearing the brazenness and brutality of Mexico's drug cartels. Most of the victims performed what are known as "narcocorridos," popular folk songs that tell the stories of the Mexican...

November 06, 2008

The Next Wave: Climate Refugees in the South Pacific

Jennifer Redfearn

Climate change is threatening to displace 2,500 inhabitants of the Carteret Atoll in the South Pacific. Their stories are the main topic explored in the Academy Award®-nominated film Sun Come Up.

March 28, 2008

Hope: Living and Loving with HIV in Jamaica

Kwame Dawes, Jamaica Production Team, Stephen Sapienza, Joshua Cogan

Poet and writer Kwame Dawes travels to Jamaica to explore the experience of people living with HIV/AIDS and to examine the ways in which the disease has shaped their lives. The journey brings him in touch with people who tell their stories, share their lives and teach him about resilience,...

This Week: The Lingering Disaster

Last April, the world was shocked and outraged by the Rana Plaza disaster—a building collapse that claimed the lives of more than 1,200 garment workers in a Dhaka sweatshop. Has anything changed?

This Week: A Moveable Piece

The latest round of US-brokered Israeli-Palestinian peace talks has produced hints of a breakthrough on the most contentious of all issues—the final status of Jerusalem.

This Week: When the Fish are Gone

Global warming, pollution and overfishing are killing the world’s oceans. Pulitzer Center grantees Erik Vance and Dominic Bracco II take us to the Sea of Cortez.

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