October 26, 2016 /
Wes Enzinna
Wes Enzinna investigates the Kurdish revolution in Syria by embedding himself as a teacher in an academy in the middle of the warzone.
October 26, 2016 /
Daniella Zalcman
Photographer uses double exposure portraits to tell the stories of indigenous Canadians placed in boarding schools to force their assimilation.
Image provided by Daniella Zalcman.
October 25, 2016 /
Daniella Zalcman
Daniella Zalcman speaks with TIME Lightbox's Olivier Laurent about her book, Signs of Your Identity.
October 25, 2016
Daniella Zalcman
Photographer presents her work including images from her new book published by FotoEvidence, "Signs of Your Identity".
Kim Il-sung Square, against a backdrop of the Taedong river and the Juche Tower on the other side.  Image by Laya Maheshwari. North Korea, 2016.
October 25, 2016
Laya Maheshwari
Going to the cinema. Playing in a water park. Shopping at a supermarket. These are leisure activities mundane in many societies, but do people in Pyongyang experience them in the same way?
Sparse traffic passes through Future Scientists Street, a gleaming, six-lane avenue that's meant to serve as a showcase for outsiders of Pyongyang's recent development. Image by Laya Maheshwari. North Korea, 2016.
October 25, 2016 / The New York Times
Laya Maheshwari
In the capital, Pyongyang, entertainment options have expanded under Kim Jong-un, giving the privileged few—and foreigners—a glimpse of a better life.
Image by Alice Su. China, 2016.
October 25, 2016
Tom Hundley
This week, China's growing isolationism and its global influence, a North Korean film festival, and highlights from our student fellows Washington weekend.
Wilfred Jackson at home. Image by Brian Castner. Canada, 2016.
October 19, 2016
Jon Sawyer
Growing Isolationism in the arctic, celebrating the Pulitzer Center's 10th anniversary, and India's dilemma of providing electricity to 1.3 billion people.
Pacific Coast Highway. Image by Erik Vance. California, 2016.
October 18, 2016 / The Last Word On Nothing
Erik Vance
Erik Vance ponders the relationship between pilgrimage and coming of age. Whether walking for God or riding to bond with your dad, we all need a spiritual journey.
October 17, 2016 / The Atlantic
Alice Su
Terror and religious extremism challenge a state unaccustomed to martyrdom narratives. Can a country doing business all over the world really avoid other peoples' politics?
University of Michigan students gather at the Bangu Women's Complex in Rio de Janeiro
October 17, 2016 / Untold Stories
Kate Toporski
Thousands of Brazilian mothers and their children are separated each year due to prison service and sentencing. A look inside one of Brazil's nursery prisons.
Visiting Trinity Church in Berlin one Sunday in July 2016. Half of the service was translated into Farsi. Image by Laura Kasinof. Germany, 2016.
October 14, 2016 / The Atlantic
Laura Kasinof
Iranian asylum seekers in Germany are converting to Christianity and filling pews in churches across Germany. What's the reason for this phenomenon?
Sharon Henio-Yazzie (pictured with an abandoned school in Ramah) was one of roughly 40,000 children from 60 tribes placed in Mormon homes between 1947 and 2000
October 14, 2016 / World Policy Journal
Daniella Zalcman
Award winning photojournalist Daniella Zalcman speaks with the World Policy Journal's On Air podcast about her work.