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Conflict

Conflict takes many forms, from disagreements between different political parties to indigenous communities battling government and corporate interests to full-blown warfare. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Conflict” feature reporting that covers adversarial politics, war and peace. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on conflict.

 

Swapping Cocaine for Peace

A voluntary coca crop substitution initiative in Colombia is failing, but it is still the country’s best option to address its cocaine production problem.

The Redemption of MS-13

Danny Gold investigates the movement converting El Salvador’s gang members into born-again Christians.

Iraq's Post-ISIS Campaign of Revenge

The corruption and cruelty of Iraq’s response to suspected jihadis and their families seem likely to lead to the resurgence of the terror group.

Rohingya Under Attack

"All I have left are my words," the Rohingya Muslim refugee said. The AP documents systematic gang rape of Rohingya women by the Myanmar military, and reconstructs a massacre in one Rohingya village.

An American War in the Sahara

The U.S. military is building a major drone base in the Sahara Desert in Niger. Joe Penney looks at how an increasing American military presence will change the West African country.

Iran's Victims of Nerve Agent Warfare

During the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s, chemical weapons killed or sickened tens of thousands of Iranians. Studies of the survivors are helping to prepare for—or even deter—future attacks.

The Federation Files

Together, more than 148 non-profit Jewish federations hold assets of $16 billion in the United States and Canada. Investigative journalist Uri Blau examines how the money is spent.

Laos: Remnants from War

Erin McGoff is producing a full-length feature independent documentary titled "Little Land of Mines" about the resilience of the Lao people as they live among and work to clear 80 million unexploded ordnance from the U.S. Secret War in Laos.

People of the Kelp

Up Canada's West Coast in search of the world's biggest unreported land conflict.

Iran Wins in Iraq

In a multi-part series for PBS NewsHour , Reza Sayah and Gelareh Kiazand look at Iran’s influence in its war-torn neighbor.

'Treasonous' Young Kurds and a Referendum

Iraqi Kurdistan wants to split from Iraq's central government. But a group of young Kurds have joined controversial Baghdad-backed militias of Iraq. They provide a unique window on where the country may be heading.

North Korea in the Era of Kim Jong Un

Three days after Donald Trump tweeted that the U.S. is "locked and loaded" in its nuclear standoff with North Korea, I arrived in Pyongyang to meet the officials responsible for analyzing America.

C.A.R. Crisis: When the State Is Absent

As the Central African Republic slips back into chaos, the government is mostly powerless to intervene. Armed groups hold the power. Here's what happens—and who steps in—when state authority is absent.

Syria: The Next Chapter

The Syrian war: We see the headlines, but know far less about the people caught in the conflict's crosshairs. What comes next for them, and how will that impact the future of the country and the wider Middle East?

Data in a Crisis

In the chaos of crisis and human displacement, aid organizations struggle to track, analyze and respond to information fast enough to provide help. Tech and data science is providing a solution.

Meet the Journalist: Uri Blau

Uri Blau used U.S. and Israeli tax records to connect the dots between American tax-exempt charities and their Israeli beneficiaries operating over the Green Line.

This Week: Stumbling Toward Nuclear War

This week: rising nuclear tensions through North Korea's eyes, refugees converting to Christianity, and how the exotic pet trade enables illegal wildlife practices in China.

This Week: A Divided Nation

This week: Protest violence in Duterte's Philippines, refugees prioritize integration and survival over religion, and how Haiti's capital manages waste without a sewer system.

Running for the Future of Congo

This lesson uses “What Makes the Kids of Congo Run” by Daniel Socha to introduce students to the situation in Eastern Congo, the challenges youth face, and ways to effect change.

Technology and Activism in Mexico

The following global affairs lesson plan for history, ELA, Spanish, and Humanities teachers investigates the use of technology in Mexico to combat corruption, and the impacts of that activism.

Israel, Palestine, and Idi Amin

The following lesson plan for teachers explores how an author balances narrative storytelling and facts while exploring Uganda's connections to Israel over several decades.

Afghanistan by Choice

This lesson plan outlines reflection and processing exercises connected to Alexandria Bombach's film "Afghanistan by Choice,” which follows five people deciding whether or not to leave Afghanistan.

Ukraine's Internally Displaced

Students investigate educational resources using diverse media in order to understand how journalists use various mediums to tell different accounts of Ukraine's internally displaced persons.