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Conflict

Conflict takes many forms, from disagreements between different political parties to indigenous communities battling government and corporate interests to full-blown warfare. Pulitzer Center grantee stories tagged with “Conflict” feature reporting that covers adversarial politics, war and peace. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on conflict.

 

The Displaced Campesinos of Nicolas Ruiz

Forced to flee their homes by a paramilitary group, the campesinos of Nicolas Ruiz—a remote farming village in southern Mexico—have gathered in the city to demand justice and reparations.

The Survivors of the Rohingya Genocide

An investigation into Myanmar's state-orchestrated murder of thousands of Rohingya Muslims — and the second tragedy unfolding in the refugee camps

A Retreat From Massacre

The T'boli-Dulangan Manobo, an indigenous group in the Philippines, lived peacefully in the village of Sitio Datalbonglangon—until the country's armed forces showed up.

Last Resort

More than two centuries after settling in Honduras, the Garifuna people are still fighting for a place to raise their families.

An American War in the Sahara

The U.S. military is building a major drone base in the Sahara Desert in Niger. Joe Penney looks at how an increasing American military presence will change the West African country.

Iran's Victims of Nerve Agent Warfare

During the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s, chemical weapons killed or sickened tens of thousands of Iranians. Studies of the survivors are helping to prepare for—or even deter—future attacks.

The Federation Files

Together, more than 148 non-profit Jewish federations hold assets of $16 billion in the United States and Canada. Investigative journalist Uri Blau examines how the money is spent.

Laos: Remnants from War

Erin McGoff is producing a full-length feature independent documentary titled "Little Land of Mines" about the resilience of the Lao people as they live among and work to clear 80 million unexploded ordnance from the U.S. Secret War in Laos.

People of the Kelp

Up Canada's West Coast in search of the world's biggest unreported land conflict.

Iran Wins in Iraq

In a multi-part series for PBS NewsHour , Reza Sayah and Gelareh Kiazand look at Iran’s influence in its war-torn neighbor.

'Treasonous' Young Kurds and a Referendum

Iraqi Kurdistan wants to split from Iraq's central government. But a group of young Kurds have joined controversial Baghdad-backed militias of Iraq. They provide a unique window on where the country may be heading.

North Korea in the Era of Kim Jong Un

Three days after Donald Trump tweeted that the U.S. is "locked and loaded" in its nuclear standoff with North Korea, I arrived in Pyongyang to meet the officials responsible for analyzing America.

C.A.R. Crisis: When the State Is Absent

As the Central African Republic slips back into chaos, the government is mostly powerless to intervene. Armed groups hold the power. Here's what happens—and who steps in—when state authority is absent.

Syria: The Next Chapter

The Syrian war: We see the headlines, but know far less about the people caught in the conflict's crosshairs. What comes next for them, and how will that impact the future of the country and the wider Middle East?

Data in a Crisis

In the chaos of crisis and human displacement, aid organizations struggle to track, analyze and respond to information fast enough to provide help. Tech and data science is providing a solution.

Mainstreaming Pakistan's Tribal Areas

Even as they grapple with US drones, the Pakistani military, and al-Qaeda and Taliban jihadis, the seven million residents of FATA are struggling to bring the rule of law to their land.

Meet the Journalist: Sonia Shah

Tens of thousands of people fleeing bombs and beheadings are trapped in squalid refugee camps and ad hoc settlements across Greece. Will the country's tattered health system be able to prevent an epidemic?

Meet the Journalist: Paul A. Kramer

As the U.S. government responded to Hurricane Katrina what difference did it make that the nation was at war? In what ways were post-Katrina relief operations experienced as the war “coming home"?

Meet the Journalist: Ben Taub

Journalist Ben Taub discusses his project, "The Assad Files," the story of how a group of war crimes investigators smuggled 600,000 pages of government documents out of Syria.

Meet the Journalist: Dominic Bracco

Photojournalist Dominic Bracco II's reporting follows Diego, a former gang member on his personal journey for reconciliation and redemption. In this video Bracco gives a behind-the-scenes look at the history of violence in Juarez.

This Week: Stumbling Toward Nuclear War

This week: rising nuclear tensions through North Korea's eyes, refugees converting to Christianity, and how the exotic pet trade enables illegal wildlife practices in China.

This Week: A Divided Nation

This week: Protest violence in Duterte's Philippines, refugees prioritize integration and survival over religion, and how Haiti's capital manages waste without a sewer system.

Exploring Fragile States: Sudan

Sudan has been a "fragile state" for more than two decades. Through this webquest, students are able to explore this complex country using several different reporting projects on Sudan.

International Adoption: Ethics and Effects

This is a multi-week unit on international adoption and ethics. Students will examine how international adoption agencies work and the role of culture, ethics, local policy, and international law.

The Arab Spring Monologues

This lesson provides guidelines for students to create their own play based on "Fractured Lands," a story published by The New York Times Magazine in the print edition on August 14, 2016.