January 11, 2009 /
This Gateway provides compelling material related to the role of women in society and the impact of industrialization and international development on women, children, and families.
August 29, 2014 /
Lauren Shepherd, Steve Sapienza
Steve Sapienza discusses his reporting on the health hazards and social pressures associated with small-scale gold mining in Peru, in an interview for Mining-Technology.
August 28, 2014 / Untold Stories
Adrian Fadil
With limited resources and threatened by settler violence, Palestinian herding families living in the South Hebron Hills are struggling to survive.
August 27, 2014 / Prospect
James Harkin
Blood and treasure: Syria's archeological treasures at risk as war goes on.
August 25, 2014 / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Meg Jones, Meghan Dhaliwal
Wisconsin National Guard’s 829th Engineer Co. is back in Afghanistan shutting down America’s longest war.
August 25, 2014 / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Meg Jones, Meghan Dhaliwal
Members of Wisconsin National Guard’s 829th Engineer Co., now stationed in Afghanistan, wonder if they will be sent to Iraq next.
August 25, 2014 / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Meg Jones, Meghan Dhaliwal
Meg Jones offers news and notes from her 2014 visit to Wisconsin troops in Afghanistan.
August 25, 2014 / The Washington Post
Ty McCormick
With war and weather pushing thousands to the brink of starvation, aid workers in South Sudan are warning of a large-scale humanitarian disaster.
August 22, 2014
Ty McCormick
Less than three years after independence, South Sudan collapsed into civil war. Thousands have died and famine looms on the horizon. Can rebel-leaders-turned-politicians lead the way to peace?
August 21, 2014 / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Meg Jones, Meghan Dhaliwal
Wisconsin National Guard troops stay in touch with their families via Facebook, Skype, phone calls and email.
August 21, 2014 / Vanity Fair
James Harkin
The most dangerous place in the world for journalists is Syria, where dozens have been killed or kidnapped.
August 21, 2014 / Reuters
David Rohde
European governments pay ransoms for the release of hostages held by terrorists. The U.S. does not. What that gap means for Americans like journalist James Foley.
August 20, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Ty McCormick
Renewed fighting in the war-torn country has derailed humanitarian relief efforts, and now tens of thousands are facing starvation.

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