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Unlike most game reserves, the Gorongosa National Park has a natural, year-long supply of water. A vast stream and river system begins on nearby Gorongosa Mountain and flows into the park, creating an expanding and contracting wetland system
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Morumbodzi Waterfall is one of the many cascades falling from the high plateau of Gorongosa Mountain.
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The water that comes off of Gorongosa Mountain feeds the unique ecosystem of the park - an expanding and contracting wetland system that provides water year round.
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In recent years, villagers from communities around Gorongosa Park have been climbing farther up the mountain to clear land for machambas, or small farms. This deforestation threatens the park's ecosystem.
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Sana Joao with her grand children – from left to right Sica, Domingo, Rociano and Alasmo. They live on the slopes of Gorongosa Mountain and speak the language unique to the mountain - chi-Gorongose.
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Locals clear the forests in order to plant their fields.
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Deforestation on Gorongosa Mountain threatens the year-round water supply to Gorongosa National Park. Trees help capture water and prevent erosion.
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Water flowing off the mountain creates the park's unique wetland system – the environment that allowed such huge herds of animals. But deforestation is threatening the mountain and its water supply – and the future of the park itself.

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Before the Mozambican civil war, Gorongosa National Park was among the top destinations in Africa, with a higher concentration of animals than on the famed Serengeti Plain. But during the war, soldiers and other poachers killed these vast herds, planted landmines and destroyed the park's infrastructure. By the 1990s, the park was all but abandoned.

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