image
Laszlo Kurucz and his five-month-old son Laszlo, of the Roma Gypsy community in their new home, which they bought with the support of the Hungarian government. Image by Nadia Shira Cohen. Hungary, 2011.
image
Peter Pallanki, 26, survived by wading through the sludge. The flesh of his legs was eaten away by the alkaline red mud. Image by Nadia Shira Cohen. Hungary, 2011.
image
Dora Juhasz, three years old, and her pregnant mother, in their new temporary home. Dora, who swallowed the red mud as it engulfed their home and her sister, is showing signs of lead poisoning. "Our family is cursed," Mrs. Juhasz said, tears streaking her cheeks. "Tragedy follows us everywhere." Image by Nadia Shira Cohen. Hungary, 2011.
image
The Roma of Devecser are one group that appears to have emerged from the disaster better off. Raised in abject poverty, most never stood a chance to move up. After the flood, the government was obligated to provide them with new homes in other neighborhoods. Image by Nadia Shira Cohen. Hungary, 2011.
image
Lorend Havasi surveyed the damage of his land, looking at what used to be an elaborate fish pond, which was destroyed in the accident. Image by Nadia Shira Cohen. Hungary, 2011.
image
A house stained by toxic red mud, destroyed during the Ajka Alumina plant accident awaited demolition. For those once living in the 350 damaged houses, the Hungarian government has offered owners a choice between a new house in the same area, an old house of equivalent value, or cash. Image by Nadia Shira Cohen. Hungary, 2011.
image
A tree stained by toxic red mud in the Kastelypark. The Hungarian government alone has spent $166 million, on clean- up and reconstruction. But nothing will ever be the same around Ajka. Image by Nadia Shira Cohen. Hungary, 2011.
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

More than 350 homes were damaged in the 2010 Ajka Alumina plant disaster. Eight months later, the victims are still struggling to start new lives.

There were more than 350 homes damaged in the Ajka Alumina plant disaster in 2010. Since then, the Hungarian government has spent more than $166 million on clean-up and reconstruction efforts. But 8 months after the accident, the victims are still struggling to rebuild their homes and start new lives.

Project

image
Poorly regulated mining and refining facilities are causing enormous devastation, while corporate interests are pushing ever harder to exploit the untapped mineral resources of the continent.

Recently

February 19, 2014 /
Ben Depp, Nadja Drost
Cross continents with eleven of our grantee journalists as they take you into the mines to show you where we get our gold––exposing the hidden social and environmental costs of this business.
February 16, 2014 /
Ben Depp, Nadja Drost
“Tarnished: The True Cost of Gold,” the Pulitzer Center’s new e-book, is now available on iTunes.