Reporting

A collection of reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees featuring international news stories published by media outlets from around the world, as well as reporting original to the Pulitzer Center website.

Displaying 7033–7044 of 7127

Georgia's Dangerous Game

While much of the world has been distracted by crises in Iran, Iraq, and North Korea, a dangerous dispute over espionage, energy, and ethnicity has been growing between Russia and its diminutive neighbor Georgia.

Millions Have Died for Our Cell Phones

The Mushangi area is nested high in eastern Congo's mountains, far from the capital, Kinshasa, on the border with Rwanda. The hills are barren, stripped of their lush vegetation both by erosion and by a seemingly never-ending conflict. While the rest of Congo prepares for the second round of presidential elections scheduled for Oct. 29, the people of Mushangi worry about one thing: survival.

Iran Sounds an Awful Lot Like Iraq

Jon Sawyer is the director of the Washington-based Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. He has reported from Iran and throughout the Middle East.

AN EMBATTLED president, a Congress distracted by a sex scandal, looming midterm elections — and yet overwhelming agreement, with scant debate or publicity, on fateful legislation that set the nation on a path to war.

It happened eight autumns ago, when three-quarters of the House of Representatives and every single senator voted for regime change in Iraq.

Has it happened again, on Iran?

A Story of People in War and Peace

Nagorno Karabakh, the mountainous territory between Azerbaijan and Armenia, is one of the "frozen conflicts" left unresolved from the collapse of the Soviet Union. Ethnic Armenians were victorious in a vicious war with Azerbaijan but no government, not even Armenia, has given Nagorno Karabakh the international recognition it seeks.

Krasnaya Sloboda

These photographs depict life in Krasnaya Sloboda, a prosperous and highly unusual town in the mountains of northeastern Azerbaijan. Krasnaya Sloboda is home to the "mountain Jews," a community of some 5,000 that traces its roots in this region for centuries and that some have linked to the lost tribes that left Israel after the destruction of the first temple.

Tbilisi and Beyond

Mountains, rivers,the ancient streets of Tbilisi tell part of Georgia's story -- and so do street demonstrations, embattled public officials, and a giant statue of Joseph Stalin that still stands in Gori, his hometown.