Reporting

A collection of reporting from Pulitzer Center grantees featuring international news stories published by media outlets from around the world, as well as reporting original to the Pulitzer Center website.

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Koor and Garang

Jen Marlowe, for the Pulitzer Center

Before leaving for Nairobi, I had spent the most time with Gabriel Bol. I had made two trips to Syracuse, piggy-backing on talks related to my previous film, Darfur Diaires that I had in Ithaca, and spent many hours in conversation with Gabriel Bol and interviewing him.

In contrast, I had spent only a day and a half with Koor in Tucson and only spoken to Garang on the phone.

Koor and Garang

Before leaving for Nairobi, I had spent the most time with Gabriel Bol. I had made two trips to Syracuse, piggy-backing on talks related to my previous film, Darfur Diaires that I had in Ithaca, and spent many hours in conversation with Gabriel Bol and interviewing him.

In contrast, I had spent only a day and a half with Koor in Tucson and only spoken to Garang on the phone.

Will Gabriel be on the Plane?

    The seven us are pecking away, each in his own tiny stall in a sweltering second-floor Internet cafe. We've just consumated a successful foray into the Kenyan bureaucracy, thanks to Jen's careful advance footwork and - who knows? the fact that the woman greeting us at Immigration happened to have spent a summer at the University of Connecticut. "That's just a couple of miles up the road from me," I tell her. She writes a letter approving our planned six-day stay at Kakuma refugee camp, which will take place on the return leg of our trip to South Sudan. She not only has the letter typed up, but sends a secretary down to tell us it will be ready in a couple of minutes.

What will we find in Sudan?

David Morse, for the Pulitzer Center

The more I learn about my traveling companions, the deeper the question becomes. What will we find in Sudan?

Each day spent here in Nairobi has been an eye-opening experience, as we go through the process of making decisions - How many mosquito nets are enough for two villages? How do we weigh the cost of getting these supplies into the bush against our collective ability to pay?

Who are we? What is this process really about? And who are we as a team?

What will we find in Sudan?

The more I learn about my traveling companions, the deeper the question becomes. What will we find in Sudan?

Each day spent here in Nairobi has been an eye-opening experience, as we go through the process of making decisions - How many mosquito nets are enough for two villages? How do we weigh the cost of getting these supplies into the bush against our collective ability to pay?

Who are we? What is this process really about? And who are we as a team?

TIA

We sat in the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) office in Nairobi as minutes stretched into hours, awaiting our permits to travel into South Sudan.

A line from the movie I had watched last night on the plane traveling from London to Nairobi kept running through my mind. The movie was “Blood Diamonds”; the line was delivered by Leonardo DiCaprio: “TIA,” he told a journalist, as his means to explain the brutality and bloodshed of the Sierra Leone civil war. “This is Africa.”

We weren’t supposed to have to wait for our permits—we had made connections in advance to the Government of South Sudan (GOSS) mission in Washington DC and had sent all our paperwork to the office in Nairobi over a month in advance, with assurances that the paper work would be done and our travel permits would be waiting for us—it would only be a matter of picking them up.