A young Syrian refugee packs tea boxes under a table in a Turkish factory near his refugee camp on the Turkey-Syria border.
A young Syrian refugee packs tea boxes under a table in a Turkish factory near his refugee camp on the Turkey-Syria border. Image by Emily Kassie. Turkey, 2016. Add this image to a lesson

Investigative journalists Malia Politzer and Emily Kassie join WNYC's Leonard Lopate to discuss their latest story in the Huffington Post Highline, “The 21st Century Gold Rush: How the refugee crisis is changing the world economy.” Their investigations profiles the people behind the global network of companies, criminals, and bureaucrats that are getting rich off the biggest refugee crisis in the world.

Project

Image by Emily Kassie. Turkey, 2016.
From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.

Recently

At least 19 Syrian child refugees have died in Turkish factories since 2013. Image by Emily Kassie. Turkey, 2016.
December 27, 2016 /
Tom Hundley
This week: how the refugee crisis changes the world economy, migrants search for their children, and Pulitzer Center staff picks for a year in photos.
December 24, 2016 / The John Batchelor Show
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
Refugees who aren’t granted asylum in Italy usually end up staying anyway despite widespread joblessness. Benefitting from the instability is the Sicilian Mafia, otherwise known as Cosa Nostra.