Story

Western Culture, Moroccan Waves

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Taghazout local Yassin Bellqber surfing at Anchors, one of the most popular surf spots in Morocco. Image courtesy of Surf Maroc.

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A surfer at Anchors. A local British-run surf hostel supports a number of Moroccan surfers. Image courtesy of Surf Maroc.

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Yassin Bellqber at Anchors. Image courtesy of Surf Maroc.

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Brahim Habib Allh carves up a wave at the main town beach break in front of Sidi Ifni, Morocco. Image courtesy of Surf Maroc.

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Brahim Habib Allh shows his cutback in Sidi Ifni, Morocco. Image courtesy of Surf Maroc.

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Simone, a Moroccan surfer. Image by David Morris. Morocco, 2011.

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Alley in Taghazout, Morocco. California-influenced surf culture has taken root in Morocco. Wandering the streets of Taghazout, it is not unusual to hear Bob Marley or Jack Johnson, musicians popular with the  American surf crowd. Image by David Morris. Morocco, 2011.

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Surf shop and mosque in Taghazout. Taghazout is the epicenter of North African surfing. Image by David Morris. Morocco, 2011.

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Mural advertising a board repair shop, Taghazout. Image by David Morris. Morocco, 2011.

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Surf shop in Sidi Ifni. Locals merchants are hopeful that surf tourism can help boost the local economy. Image by David Morris. Morocco, 2011.

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Los Infinos, surfers from Sidi Ifni, always seem to travel together in groups. They have become cultural icons for the town. Image by David Morris. Morocco, 2011.

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Point break south of Mirleft. Morroco enjoys some of the best surfing in North Africa. Image by David Morris. Morocco, 2011.

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Sign showing planned real estate development near Mirleft. Locals here complain about the "California-style"  condos being  built on the outskirts of town. Image by David Morris. Morocco, 2011.

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Surf shop in Mirleft, southern Morocco. Situated at the end of the Euro-African "Hippie Trail," surfing was first introduced to Morocco in the late 1960s. Image by David Morris. Morocco, 2011.

Surfing helped transform American youth culture in the 1960s. Now, in places like Morocco and Gaza, it is introducing a new generation of Arab youth to an alternative vision of Western culture, one based on a love of the ocean and the many joys it can provide. Australians wandering down from Europe introduced surfing to Morocco in the late 1960s. Since then the sport has exploded in popularity.