As the world sprints to end AIDS, the spotlight shines on successful prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programs. However, in the early 2000s in Malawi, less than 20 percent of mothers received HIV drugs. Consequently an entire cohort of children were born with HIV. These young people are now coming to terms with the disease—and living fulfilling lives. Jennifer Stephens takes us inside teen clinics for HIV-positive youth that provide support to this special group of young heroes in Malawi.

Project

Leaders of Nzotheka Support Group for young people living with HIV in Lilongwe
As the world sprints to end AIDS, adolescents and young people suffer from HIV in the shadows with girls and young women bearing the brunt in Malawi.

Recently

Young hero Innocencia Mpinda.  Image by Jen Stephens.  Malawi, 2016.  Innocencia Mpinda, now 18 years old, learned she was HIV positive at age 14.  She shares, “I felt like I was going to die.”  Having lost her mother at age 8, Innocencia was confused when she learned of her status: “I wanted to shout…because I didn’t know where the virus was from.”   Innocencia was raised by her grandparents.  She recalls painful episodes of discrimination from her grandfather and best friend which led her to leave her hom
September 30, 2016 / Untold Stories
Jennifer Stephens
As the world sprints to end AIDS, young people born with HIV but never told by their guardians are coming to terms with their disease—and living fulfilling lives.
Violet Banda found out she was HIV positive at age 14 when living with her aunt.
September 29, 2016 / Global Health NOW
Jennifer Stephens
As the world sprints to end AIDS, young people born with HIV but never told of their condition by their guardians are coming to terms with their disease—and living fulfilling lives.