Projects

Reporting projects from Pulitzer Center grantees

Displaying 829–840 of 918
June 10, 2009

Kenya: Uneasy Neighbors

Ernest Waititu

Kenya's Kakuma Refugee Camp was for years among the world's most famous, home to the "Lost Boys" of southern Sudan and as many as 90,000 refugees and displaced persons. Today those still here are fighting for their lives, caught between "donor fatigue" and a struggle over limited resources with...

June 07, 2009

India: Water for All?

Sonali Kudva

In September 2007, the government of Maharashtra, India, invited bids from private companies for the completion of the Nira-Deogarh water project in the Satara district of Maharashtra. The construction of the dam was completed some years prior to this, but canals for irrigation and distribution were not. It was...

May 23, 2009

Guinea-Bissau: West Africa's New Achilles' Heel

Marco Vernaschi

An international network led by Latin American drug cartels and the Lebanese Islamist group Hezbollah has chosen West Africa, among the poorest and more corrupted corners of the world, as the nexus for illegal trade in cocaine, oil, counterfeit medicines, pirated music and human trafficking. International law enforcement officials...

May 18, 2009

Latvia: Coping with Economic Collapse

Akim Aginsky, Kristina Rizga

For more than a decade the ex-Soviet republic of Latvia was a poster child of seamless transition to a prosperous post-Communist world. It entered the European Union in 2004 and for several years thereafter posted one of Europe's highest growth rates, fueled by access to cheap credit and domestic...

May 11, 2009

South Asia's Troubled Waters

Anna-Katarina Gravgaard, William Wheeler

The majority of India's water sources are polluted. A lack of access to safe water contributes to a fifth of its communicable diseases. Each day in the booming, nuclear-armed nation, diarrhea alone kills more than 1,600 people.

The regional scenario is even more grim given the projected...

May 04, 2009

Run or Hide? Seeking Refuge in Tanzania

Mary Wiltenburg

When Bill Clinton Hadam's refugee family was approved for resettlement in the U.S., the boy's parents faced a "Sophie's Choice" dilemma: him or his sister. After escaping slaughter in Congo and Rwanda, the family waited in a Tanzanian camp for nearly a decade. Rape was common there, and Bill's...

May 03, 2009

Afghanistan: Civilians Under Siege

Jason Motlagh

In 2008, there were over 2,100 civilians casualties across Afghanistan. US airstrikes accounted for 552 deaths, up more than 70% compared to the year before. Militants were responsible for more than half the overall total. The bitter truth is that most of these incidents could be avoided. And yet...

April 21, 2009

Altar, Sonora: The Business of Smuggling

David Rochkind, Sacha Feinman

Once a sleepy agricultural town, the entire economy of Altar, Sonora is, at this point, based on human smuggling. Sitting just an hour drive south of the Arizona-Mexico border, Altar is the last and most critical stop before migrants take to the dangerous desert crossing. Sacha Feinman and David...

April 17, 2009

Clan wars in the Philippines

Orlando de Guzman

Sulu is an archipelago of some 900 islands and has been the target of an American-assisted counter-insurgency program for the past 4 years. Abu Sayyaf insurgents have been largely routed, and according to the Philippine military their numbers have been reduced to less than 300.

This is...

April 13, 2009

Desertification in China

Sean Gallagher

Desertification is one of the most important environmental challenges facing the world today, however it is arguably the most under-reported. Desertification is the gradual transformation of arable and habitable land into desert, usually caused by climate change and/or the improper use of land. Each year, desertification and drought account...

April 10, 2009

Northern Ireland: In The Shadow of The Walls

Scott P. Harris

In talking about the Real IRA, the splinter group that took responsibility for the March 7 attack on an army barracks outside of Belfast that left two soldiers dead, Chief Constable Sir Hugh Orde has said, "The people we are arresting are not 50 or 60 year olds from...

April 08, 2009

Southern Africa: Sustainable Hunting?

Brendan Borrell

The black rhino is emblematic of how civil war and corruption in Africa decimate endangered animal populations and rob local economies of potential sources of income. Black rhinos have declined from 65,000 in 1970 to 4,000 today due to crises in Mozambique, Angola, and, now, Zimbabwe.

Since...