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The Portrait Is Falling: The Last Days of Robert Mugabe

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Robert Mugabe, president of Zimbabwe, attends the 12th African Union Summit. Image courtesy WikiCommons. Ethiopia, 2009.

Robert Mugabe, president of Zimbabwe, attends the 12th African Union Summit. Image courtesy WikiCommons. Ethiopia, 2009.

With considerable trepidation, I took the lift to the sixth floor of the ministry of justice in central Harare to interview the minister. It wasn’t just that I lacked the accreditation foreign journalists must obtain to work in Zimbabwe – the interview had been arranged through unofficial back channels. The minister, Emmerson Mnangagwa, also happens to be the vice-president, Robert Mugabe’s notoriously brutal chief enforcer for the past 36 years, and the most feared man in the country. “They don’t call him ‘The Crocodile’ for nothing,” said a Zimbabwean businessman who knows him well. “He never says a word but suddenly he bites. He’s very dangerous.”

But Mnangagwa, still powerfully built at 74, proved courteous enough as we sat in deep leather armchairs in his bright and spacious office. It was not in his interest to be hostile – not at this time. He is determined to succeed Mugabe and he will need Western support to rebuild his shattered country if he does, which is presumably why he gave me an almost unprecedented interview.

The full story can be read later this week online at The New Statesmen.