October 20, 2014 /
Karim Chrobog, Lynn Hicks
How wasteful are we when it comes to our food? What is the China doing to feed its hungry and what role is the U.S. playing?
October 14, 2014 /
Katherine Doyle
Journalism professor Bill Freivogel and former fellow Julia Rendleman cap a weekend of spirited discussion by this year's students on global issues.
October 14, 2014 /
Sonia Shah, Dan McCarey
"Mapping Cholera: A Tale of Two Cities" is now available to embed for free, anywhere.
June 6, 2014
Amanda Ottaway
On June 19, the Pulitzer Center's D.C. education program participates in the "Do More 24" online giving campaign. Please support our work!
June 2, 2014
Alissa Quart, Alice Proujansky
Writer Alissa Quart and photographer Alice Proujansky discuss their project about a nanny's reunification with her son after a decade of separation for economic reasons.
Image by Philip Brasher. Ethiopia, 2014.
May 27, 2014
Philip Brasher
The Obama administration is spending $3.5 billion and partnering with multinational corporations to increase food production in 19 of the world's poorest countries.
May 23, 2014 / Untold Stories
Jonathan Vigliotti
Due to climate change, polar bears are foraging for food in remote villages.
May 22, 2014 / Untold Stories
Jonathan Vigliotti
Climate change is for real in Greenland.
May 13, 2014 / PRI's The World
Alissa Quart
For ten years, Blanca has cared for other people's children. Now, she is finally reunited with her own son.
May 12, 2014
Tom Hundley
Millions of women from poor countries work as caregivers in America, part of a massive but largely invisible workforce.
Image by Alice Proujansky. United States, 2014.
May 6, 2014
Alissa Quart, Alice Proujansky
Millions of women from poor countries come to work in America as caregivers or nannies. Who looks after their children back home?
May 6, 2014 / The Nation
Alissa Quart, Alice Proujansky
When only US wages can support families in the Global South, parents and children divide to survive.
May 1, 2014 / The Seattle Times
Craig Welch, Steve Ringman
Scientists have documented that souring seas caused by CO2 emissions are dissolving pteropods, a key marine food source. The research raises questions about what other sea life might be affected.

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