Region

North America

Lines and Lineage

2017 CatchLight Fellow Tomas van Houtryve explores the history of the U.S.-Mexico border through period-accurate photography in this photo essay for Harper's.

Fantasy Island

Exporting British Columbia’s abundant energy resources should have been a slam dunk. How did a multibillion-dollar dream go up in smoke?

New E-book: 'Toxic Planet: The Global Health Crisis'

The Pulitzer Center launches its newest e-book: "Toxic Planet: The Global Health Crisis"—a searing look at pollution, an issue that affects us all. Now available on iTunes, Atavist, and Kindle.

Only the Bridge Matters Now

Northern Virginia’s Bolivian community is up to 150,000, enough to be Bolivia’s 9th largest city. By sustaining tradition, memory, and love for their hometowns, the community keeps families united.

February 12, 2018

People 4 Trump

Max Toomey, Sarah Bellingham

Feeling abandoned and disenfranchised, a group of previously apolitical voters in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, wages a grassroots campaign for the only man they feel can save them.

January 25, 2018

Tomas van Houtryve's Pulitzer Center Catchlight Fellowship

Tomas van Houtryve

The Pulitzer Center Catchlight Media fellow, Tomas van Houtryve, reports on the U.S.-Mexico border and the “weaponization” of photography using historical photographic techniques alongside cutting-edge surveillance technology.

December 15, 2017

Inter(Nation)al

Isaac Kestenbaum, Allison Herrera, Josephine Holtzman

Inter(Nation)al ​explores current events through the lens of treaties signed between the U.S. Government and Native Nations. These treaties bind all of us—legally and culturally.

December 14, 2017

Border Fence Land Grab

Julian Aguilar, Kiah Collier

Donald Trump's promised border wall will involve taking land from hundreds of people. An earlier land grab to build border fencing was rushed, sloppy, and gave landowners wildly differing payments.

November 22, 2017

100 Days in the Arctic

Amy Martin

Season two of Threshold takes listeners to the homes, hunting grounds, and melting coastlines of Arctic peoples, where climate change isn’t an abstract concept, but a part of daily life.

October 31, 2017

The Federation Files

Uri Blau, Akela Lacy

Together, more than 148 non-profit Jewish federations hold assets of $16 billion in the United States and Canada. Investigative journalist Uri Blau examines how the money is spent.

October 23, 2017

People of the Kelp

Saul G. Elbein, Jim McAuley

Up Canada's West Coast in search of the world's biggest unreported land conflict.

October 18, 2017

Puerto Rico: Crisis in the Caribbean

Ryan Michalesko

Weeks after Hurricane Maria made landfall in Puerto Rico, the island continues its battle for food, water and electricity. Ryan Michalesko reports on the fate of this U.S. territory and its people.

September 19, 2017

Harvey Aftermath

Alex MacLean, Daniel Grossman

Hurricane Harvey caused unprecedented flooding of the U.S. Gulf Coast. Alex MacLean and Daniel Grossman fly over the region to report on the damage and seek lessons for better storm resilience.

September 18, 2017

Iowa in the Heart of China

Kyle Munson, Kelsey Kremer

At the center of the relationship between the world's two main superpowers are a small agricultural state and its governor-turned-ambassador. The stakes never have been higher for these "old friends."

September 15, 2017

Uranium Dreams

Ben Mauk

The uranium boom reshaped the American southwest in the 1950s and 1960s. Ben Mauk reports on the industry's environmental legacy and economic future.

Meet the Journalist: James Whitlow Delano

Post-NAFTA Mexico was flooded with cheap sugary, fatty junk food from the U.S.–triggering a dual crisis: obesity and malnutrition. As NAFTA renegotiations progress, will these crises come up at all?

Meet the Journalist: Ben Mauk

In the 1950s the Cold War forever changed the American southwest, as thousands of hopeful uranium prospectors took to the hills in Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and beyond.

Meet the Journalist: Paul A. Kramer

As the U.S. government responded to Hurricane Katrina what difference did it make that the nation was at war? In what ways were post-Katrina relief operations experienced as the war “coming home"?

This Week: Botched Land Grab Along the Border

This week: A land grab at the U.S.-Mexico border reveals how the government might go about building the wall, a history of land grabs by the government are revealed by a laundry list of treaties with American Indian nations, and the women taking on military duty in the Central African Republic.

This Week: Contagion That Travels by Plane

This week: How poor hygiene on planes leads to the spread of dangerous communicable diseases, how Sámi people are caught between a climate change solution and their own livelihoods, and how you can double your holiday gift to the Pulitzer Center.

Everyday DC: Lesson 7

Lesson 7/7. In this lesson, students conclude their work on Everyday DC by completing a final individual and collaborative project.

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