February 26, 2015 / Foreign Policy
Caryle Murphy
Is King Salman's new court a breath of fresh air—or is it reactionaries looking to take the country back in time?
February 25, 2015 /
Tim McGirk, Jason Motlagh
After dozens of vaccination workers were killed in Afghanistan, polio once again began to spread into the borderlands. The same strain is now re-surfacing in Syria.
February 25, 2015 / National Geographic
Tim McGirk
Volunteers fighting polio in Pakistan are under attack as a result of a U.S. health program to track an al Qaeda leader.
November 11, 2014 / PRI's The World
Ari Daniel
Karen and her family once lived a happy life in Syria. But when the civil war arrived, they fled to Lebanon with little more than a few suitcases, and their two-week stay has now lasted two years.
Screenshot from the short film by Ari Daniel: The Young Future of Lebanon. Lebanon, 2014.
November 11, 2014
Ari Daniel
Beirut is fissured from political and sectarian strain. Many of the kids living there are on the edges of those cracks. This project tells the stories of those kids as radio and video portraits.
November 9, 2014 / The New Yorker
Jenna Krajeski
A fragile peace between Turkey and its Kurdish population is being tested by the ongoing conflict in Kobani, which is fueling Kurdish national mobilizations.
October 30, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Caryle Murphy
In Saudi Arabia, a new generation is pushing back against the government’s embrace of fundamentalism. But is the kingdom ready for nonbelievers?
October 24, 2014 / Untold Stories
James Harkin
Propaganda images of children at ISIS facilities and children in ISIS dawah (outreach) projects in ISIS-controlled areas of Syria and Iraq.
October 22, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Meghan Dhaliwal
This is what dismantling 10 years of war in Afghanistan looks like.
October 22, 2014 / Foreign Policy
Meg Jones
Thirteen years after Wisconsin’s 829th Engineer Co. deployed to build Afghanistan’s war infrastructure, they’re back to tear it apart and take it home.
October 21, 2014 / Harper's
James Harkin
How did a terror organization considered too bloody for Al Qaeda morph into something like a government with its own territory—and with troops at the border of a NATO member state?
September 30, 2014 / The New York Times
Jenna Krajeski, Sebastian Meyer
When the Islamic State threatened Kirkuk's borders, Kurdish peshmerga rushed in to protect it. But some of the city's residents see the presence of Kurdish forces as an occupying force.
September 30, 2014 / Harper's
Jenna Krajeski, Sebastian Meyer
When the Islamic State pushed Iraqi Christians from their homes, many fled to Erbil in Iraqi Kurdistan. There, some sought refuge in the concrete frame of a future shopping mall.

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