October 10, 2012 /
Paul Salopek
Journalist Paul Salopek is preparing to leave on a journey that will take seven years and span 39 countries—and he is doing it all on foot.
This photo of a Syrian refugee girl was taken by Syrian-born pediatric neurologist Tarif Bakdash. Image by Mark Hoffman. Jordan, 2016.
July 24, 2016 / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Mark Johnson, Mark Hoffman
From 6,000 miles away, Tarif Bakdash tries to heal victims of the Syrian civil war.
A 44-year-old father of five recounts during a clinic session in March with social worker Stacey Volkman (left) and Syrian-born pediatric neurologist Tarif Bakdash the seven months of torture he endured in Syria. Image by Mark Hoffman. Jordan, 2016.
July 24, 2016 / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Mark Johnson, Mark Hoffman
In Jordan, Wisconsin medical team treats refugees who have survived bombing and torture.
Zaatari camp
July 24, 2016 / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Mark Johnson, Mark Hoffman
A medical team from Wisconsin crosses the globe to help at a camp of 80,000 refugees in Jordan.
Entebbe Airport hostage return
July 7, 2016
Tom Hundley, Helen Epstein
In 1971, Israel believed that Ugandan military officer Idi Amin would serve as loyal ally. It soon learned otherwise.
June 30, 2016
Katherine Doyle
Persephone Miel fellow and photojournalist Ako Salemi to report on climate change in Iran.
Entebbe Airport image
June 28, 2016 / The New Yorker
Helen Epstein
In 1971, Israel believed that Ugandan military officer Idi Amin would serve as loyal ally. It soon learned otherwise.
Silwan neighborhood..
June 28, 2016 / Haaretz
Uri Blau
The Amana movement that carries out settlement construction in the West Bank has been receiving tens of millions from a mystery company in the Central American tax haven.
Hezbollah Funeral
June 24, 2016 / Foreign Policy
James Harkin
In Assad-controlled regions of Syria, the Lebanese group is making friends, influencing militias, and developing a new model of asymmetric warfare.
Syrian Army Sniper.
June 24, 2016 / Prospect Magazine
James Harkin
The country needs more than the absence of war—Syrians desperately need economic opportunity.
Syria's war has left the country without eligible men
June 22, 2016 / Daily Mail
James Harkin
Damascus and other Syrian cities have seen a decline in number of men.
June 9, 2016 / The New York Times
Alexandria Bombach
For Afghans who are struggling with the question of whether to leave or stay in their country, the debate goes beyond wanting to improve their lives — it is about survival.
June 5, 2016 / Making Contact
Reese Erlich
In this radio documentary for Making Contact, Reese Erlich delves into the political and economic impact of Iranian youth on the country's government.

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