October 10, 2012 /
Paul Salopek
Journalist Paul Salopek is preparing to leave on a journey that will take seven years and span 39 countries—and he is doing it all on foot.
Lake Urmia in the Sharafkhaneh Port. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.
January 10, 2017 /
Tom Hundley
This week: Climate change in Iran observed, Chinese immigrants are reversing course, and Robert Mugabe's legacy in Zimbabwe.
Fishermen in Kangan, Iran, near the South Pars field. Image by Ako Salemi. Iran, 2016.
January 2, 2017 / The New Yorker
Ako Salemi
Ako Salemi photographs climate change in Iran.
Investigator Iyad Haddad explains the injuries the different spent weapons in his office have done to Palestinians. Image by Matt Kennard. Palestine, 2016.
December 28, 2016 / The Electronic Intifada
Matt Kennard
The Israeli arms industry is still marketing weapons used in Gaza and the West Bank as "battle-proven" and using the Palestinian territories as a "laboratory" to try them out.
At least 19 Syrian child refugees have died in Turkish factories since 2013. Image by Emily Kassie. Turkey, 2016.
December 27, 2016
Tom Hundley
This week: how the refugee crisis changes the world economy, migrants search for their children, and Pulitzer Center staff picks for a year in photos.
Courtesy of Robert Amos.
December 27, 2016 / Mother Jones
Wes Enzinna
Robert Amos, an American veteran, created American Veterans of Kurdish Armed Forces and lobbied for more military assistance in Syria.
Food, beds, pillows—those are luxuries in the ghettos of Agadez. Image by Emily Kassie. Niger, 2016.
December 23, 2016 / Huffington Post
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
These are the stories of the CEOs, criminal masterminds, pencil-pushers and low-flying vultures who have figured out how to profit from global instability, also known as human suffering.
Image by Emily Kassie. Turkey, 2016.
December 23, 2016
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.
Taimma Abazli, 24, holds her new baby Heln in their tent at the Karamalis camp in Thessaloniki. Image by Lynsey Addario for TIME. Greece, September 2016.
December 19, 2016
Lynsey Addario, Aryn Baker, Francesca Trianni
Following the lives of four Syrian refugee mothers and their babies from the day these women gave birth through their newborns’ all-important milestones: first smiles, first meals, first steps.
In the crown prince’s vision, Saadiyat Island would include luxury hotels, Marbella-style villas, a boutique shopping quarter, and, most important, a vast cultural district. Image by Knut Egil Wang. UAE, 2016.
December 13, 2016
Tom Hundley
This week: what it really cost to build Abu Dhabi, summary executions in the Philippines, and the Syrian singer who lives on.
The Louvre Abu Dhabi dome and the site of the Guggenheim’s troubled project. Image by Knut Egil Wang. UAE, 2016.
December 12, 2016
Negar Azimi, Knut Egil Wang
The world’s leading architects, the most vulnerable laborers, and a movement of concerned artists converge on a man-made island in the Persian Gulf called Saadiyat, which means “happiness” in Arabic.
When Emirati officials are challenged about their labor policies, they often point to the Saadiyat Accommodation Village, where most of the island’s workers are required to live. Image by Knut Egil Wang. UAE, 2016.
December 12, 2016 / The New Yorker
Negar Azimi, Knut Egil Wang
New museums in the Emirates raise the issue of workers’ rights.
A Free Syrian Army fighter takes cover during clashes with Syrian Army in the Salaheddine neighbourhood of central Aleppo August 7, 2012. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic courtesty Creative Commons. Syria, 2016.
December 8, 2016 / GQ UK
James Harkin
In 2011, a Syrian protest anthem captured the world's attention after being recorded on a phone and uploaded to YouTube. Now, James Harkin reveals the story of the real hero behind the song that...

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