October 10, 2012 /
Paul Salopek
Journalist Paul Salopek is preparing to leave on a journey that will take seven years and span 39 countries—and he is doing it all on foot.
Your limits are in your head. Image by Erin Wilson, courtesy of Outside.
January 19, 2017 / Outside
Erik Vance
How our minds push our bodies to defy expectations, beliefs, and even our own biology—in short, to make miracles.
Image by Misha Friedman. South Africa, 2016.
January 13, 2017 /
kem knapp sawyer, Jordan Roth
Pulitzer Center launches its newest e-book: To End Aids featuring stories, photographs and video by our grantees. Also included: a timeline, interactive maps, a glossary, and resources.
A young Syrian refugee packs tea boxes under a table in a Turkish factory near his refugee camp on the Turkey-Syria border.
January 10, 2017 / WNYC Radio
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
Journalists Malia Politzer and Emily Kassie discuss their project in the HuffingtonPost Highline, “The 21st Century Gold Rush: How the refugee crisis is changing the world economy."
Guns line the wall of a private military company training centre in Hereford. Image by Matt Kennard. England, 2016.
January 10, 2017 / The Guardian
Matt Kennard
With the SAS based nearby, this picturesque city has a long military history. Now Hereford is formalizing its place as a center for a controversial industry which boomed during the ‘war on terror'.
At least 19 Syrian child refugees have died in Turkish factories since 2013. Image by Emily Kassie. Turkey, 2016.
December 27, 2016
Tom Hundley
This week: how the refugee crisis changes the world economy, migrants search for their children, and Pulitzer Center staff picks for a year in photos.
December 24, 2016 / The John Batchelor Show
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
Refugees who aren’t granted asylum in Italy usually end up staying anyway despite widespread joblessness. Benefitting from the instability is the Sicilian Mafia, otherwise known as Cosa Nostra.
Food, beds, pillows—those are luxuries in the ghettos of Agadez. Image by Emily Kassie. Niger, 2016.
December 23, 2016 / Huffington Post
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
These are the stories of the CEOs, criminal masterminds, pencil-pushers and low-flying vultures who have figured out how to profit from global instability, also known as human suffering.
Abeer and her family arrive in Munich. Image provided by Abeer Albadawi. Germany, 2016.
December 23, 2016 / Time
Aryn Baker
Being granted asylum means making a snap decision that will change your future forever.
Image by Emily Kassie. Turkey, 2016.
December 23, 2016
Malia Politzer, Emily Kassie
From smugglers in Agadez, to factory owners in Turkey, to the Italian and Nigerian mafias in Italy, and small business owners in Greece, people making a killing off the global migrant crisis.
Taimma Abazli, 24, holds her new baby Heln in their tent at the Karamalis camp in Thessaloniki. Image by Lynsey Addario for TIME. Greece, September 2016.
December 19, 2016
Lynsey Addario, Aryn Baker, Francesca Trianni
Following the lives of four Syrian refugee mothers and their babies from the day these women gave birth through their newborns’ all-important milestones: first smiles, first meals, first steps.
Taimaa Abazli, 24, holds her new baby Heln in their tent at the Karamalis camp in Thessaloniki. Image by Lynsey Addario for TIME. Greece, 2016.
December 19, 2016 / Time
Aryn Baker, Lynsey Addario, Francesca Trianni
How do you keep a family together when you've lost everything? TIME follows Syrian refugees as they give birth in Greece, and raise their children in uncertainty.
December 15, 2016
Laura Kasinof
Laura Kasinof learns what it means to leave everything behind and move to a new country with little knowledge of what the future will hold.

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